Author Topic: The Coalition Government  (Read 56419 times)

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stuey Online
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Re: The Coalition Government
Reply #1350 : May 21, 2013, 11:13:36 AM »
I dont think it is fair minded students and genuine people seeking to move the country forward, that people have an issue with Diego ,its the tens of thousands of migrants coming here with no skill level taking benefits ,paralizing  our nhs ,a system set up for x amount and now getting swamped by millions who put nothing towards it ,its much deeper than just saying we dont want immigrants, which i dont think is totally true .


Let's not forget the scam merchants from some east European countries etc who arrive penniless and are well versed in screwing the system relentlessy and are only here for that reason.
After saying that the far right use that situation to their best advantage.

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Re: The Coalition Government
Reply #1351 : May 21, 2013, 01:47:36 PM »
You will always get some party taking advantage of a situation Stuey thats how it works ,most of them are not in it for the people ,they are there to score points and rip us off , i dont believe anyone without something to offer this country should be allowed in ,we have been too soft for far too long ,its got to end ,or else there will be serious ramifications in the future ,we already have no go ares in this country just how can that be right ,its the same with the racial issue been pedalled and manipulated to meet certain agenda,s ,instead  of being properly addressed.

stuey Online
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Re: The Coalition Government
Reply #1352 : May 22, 2013, 10:58:05 AM »
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-22613209

Clegg And PM Say Coalition Will Last.

Finally Clegg admits the Tory's can f**k him and his party relentlessly and he is prepared to grit his teeth and bear it.
The LibDems are prepared to prostitute their declared mandate as they have done regarding welfare and Europe amongst other things and toe the Tory line for nothing more than the ego of a political has been

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Re: The Coalition Government
Reply #1353 : May 22, 2013, 05:07:30 PM »
That about sums them up Stuey the back bone of an amoeba.

stuey Online
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Re: The Coalition Government
Reply #1354 : May 22, 2013, 05:55:04 PM »
bbc news

          IMF: UK ''Long Way From Recovery''

The UK is still a long way from ''a strong and sustainable recovery'', the IMF has warned.
In it's concluding statement on it's mission to the UK, the International Monetary Fund said austerity measures were acting as a drag on the econmy''.
The government could do more to offset the negative impact of austerity with infrastructure spending, it said.
George Osborne said the UK would not ''duck it's economic challenges''.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-22623519


Osborne continues his waffle which is backed by the CBI and the banks while universally his policy's are condemned.

That about sums them up Stuey the back bone of an amoeba.

....and as slippery and parasitic mate.
« Last Edit: May 22, 2013, 06:17:05 PM by stuey »

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Re: The Coalition Government
Reply #1355 : May 22, 2013, 09:59:51 PM »
What kind of following do UKIP have in the city of Liverpool? I'll be disappointed if it's big.

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Re: The Coalition Government
Reply #1356 : May 23, 2013, 08:41:13 AM »
The horrific, grotesque events in our capital city highlight the governments failings in what we were assured were matters of the highest concern to them.

National security:

That two dangerous individuals can go about their nefarius activities without being monitored or picked up on the Special Services radar is alarming, billions are being spent thousands of miles away on increasingly obscure threats while an innocent man is decapitated in London by lunatic extremists apparently.

 Immigration and Customs and excise:

We are assured that the efficiency measures and streamlining of the above organisations which of course involves redundencies in their number, would serve to hone and improve their role in detecting undesirable aliens and expelling or detaining them.
Having observed such checks myself over the last two or three years and seen the madness at the airport terminal with increasing numbers of applicants facing less and less scrutiny, the prospect of extremists entering the country is more likely with the overworked and therefore innefficient security personel.

 The Armed Forces:

Again while we are bombarded with propoganda regarding patriotism and flag waving with assurances that the ultimate priority is protecting the national security, the government endeavour to discard soldiers, sailors and airmen in their thousands while the more efficient killing tech. is implemented.
But paradoxically guess what? It doesn't work like that.

While all this mayhem ensues where is our coalition 50% leader?
 In Europe discussing some f**king nonsense about an EU referendum in 2017.
 This madness gets more like Apocalypse Now every f**king day.     
« Last Edit: May 23, 2013, 08:57:47 AM by stuey »

stuey Online
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Re: The Coalition Government
Reply #1357 : May 27, 2013, 12:00:44 PM »
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-22673164

One of the suspects in the Woolwich attack was arrested and deported from Kenya two years ago for terrorist activities, the Home Office reports that it provided consular assistance and the terrorist was ''repatriated''.

What the f**k is going on??

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Re: The Coalition Government
Reply #1358 : May 28, 2013, 08:21:58 AM »
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/politics/spending-review/10083049/Iain-Duncan-Smith-cut-welfare-to-fund-police-and-Forces.html

Iain Duncan Smith has offered to cut welfare in order to fund the Forces and the police.
You couldn't make this up!!

George Osborne is getting nervous about his and his colleague's jobs. . On Breakfast TV trying to convince the presenters he knows what he is doing, the presenters by the way were scratching their arses and reading script for whatever, totally unimpressed with the Chancellor of the Exchequer as are the electorate.
Osborne has risen at 5am to appear on the show it was live and not recorded, in the hope that the viewing public in their millions will be in a semi-conscious, half asleep condition and be taken in by his pathetic rhetoric.
It is Osborne who is semi-comatose if he think anyone believes him or the liars he takes orders from.
« Last Edit: May 28, 2013, 08:40:43 AM by stuey »

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Re: The Coalition Government
Reply #1359 : June 01, 2013, 07:35:29 PM »
What kind of following do UKIP have in the city of Liverpool? I'll be disappointed if it's big.

A work colleague of mine has stood a few time for MP in Liverpool for UKIP, he was a friend, but I do not like his morels and religious beliefs. I don't think he has changed, just I have got to know him better.

I do not think they have a big following here.

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Re: The Coalition Government
Reply #1360 : June 02, 2013, 12:36:01 AM »
No.10 rocked by secret love affair: 'Stunned' PM holds crisis talks over fears tryst will 'blow political agenda out of the water'

  • Identities of people involved or details of relationship cannot be disclosed
  • They are middle-aged figures and the affair has now concluded
  • Mr Cameron was ‘stunned’ when told the identities of alleged lovers
  • He ‘immediately realised the importance of the story’, sources revealed
  • 'None of us could believe it when we first heard it' said senior source

David Cameron has held crisis talks at Downing Street after being told of allegations of a sensational love affair which has potentially significant political implications for him.

For legal reasons, The Mail on Sunday cannot disclose the identities of the people involved or any details of the relationship – even its duration – other than that they are middle-aged figures. The affair has now concluded.

But this newspaper can report that when aides told Mr Cameron the identities of the alleged lovers he was ‘stunned’, and, according to sources, ‘immediately realised the importance of the story’.

The Prime Minister and his aides also discussed the possible fallout should details of the affair become public – and how such disclosure could ‘blow out of the water’ any major political set pieces planned by No 10.

One senior source told this newspaper last night: ‘This revelation is dynamite. None of us could believe it when we first heard it. Then we just thought, “What a complete mess”.’

The source added that, apart from the political implications, the revelation had caused ‘great personal distress to innocent parties’.

It is understood that the Prime Minister was told of the relationship within the past few weeks.

If details of the affair do emerge, it could place a further strain on Mr Cameron’s leadership, which is already being tested by backbench revolts over issues such as Europe and gay marriage and rumours of plots being hatched to overthrow him.

On Friday, he faced a further blow when one of his MPs, Patrick Mercer, resigned the party whip after being caught in a cash-for-questions ‘sting’ operation.

If the affair is revealed, it is likely to cause as much public surprise as the disclosure of the relationship between John Major and Edwina Currie, which was kept secret for nearly two decades until 2002.

Like Mr Major, Mr Cameron is increasingly finding his time in Downing Street is beset by sex scandals.

Just weeks ago, the Commons was rocked by the news that Deputy Speaker Nigel Evans, a Tory MP, had been arrested following allegations that he raped one man and sexually assaulted another between 2009 and 2013 – accusations he has branded ‘completely false’.

A third person has also given a statement to Lancashire police, claiming to have been sexually assaulted by Mr Evans, and on Friday police said they were planning to interview a fourth alleged victim who claims he was intimately groped by Mr Evans in a Commons bar.

In April, Scotland Yard said it had launched a formal investigation into allegations of sexual misconduct by the Liberal Democrat peer Lord Rennard.

The Metropolitan Police set up a phoneline for alleged victims after a number of women made claims about inappropriate conduct by the peer, who was the party’s former chief election strategist.

Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg, who had initially denied knowing about the allegations, was later forced to concede that his office had heard ‘indirect and non-specific concerns’ as far back as 2008.

And, in a further case, Liberal Democrat MP Mike Hancock will tomorrow face a disciplinary hearing to determine whether he should lose the party whip over ‘very serious allegations’ of sexual assault.

Mr Clegg asked the party’s chief whip to convene the meeting after Hancock was served papers as part of a High Court civil action brought by a ‘vulnerable’ constituent.

When asked about the affair last night, a Downing Street source said: ‘This is not something we can talk about.’


http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2334483/No-10-rocked-secret-love-affair-Stunned-PM-holds-crisis-talks-fears-tryst-blow-political-agenda-water.html
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Re: The Coalition Government
Reply #1361 : June 02, 2013, 12:38:52 AM »
Yeah just read about that HR, very intrigued who it involves.

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Re: The Coalition Government
Reply #1362 : June 02, 2013, 01:20:05 AM »
Yeah just read about that HR, very intrigued who it involves.

Guessing games will begin when the next cabinet reshuffle happens.
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Re: The Coalition Government
Reply #1363 : June 03, 2013, 02:28:40 PM »
Super-rich on rise as number of £1m-plus earners doubles
Campaigners say inequality gap is widening as 18,000 people earn more than £1m

The number of taxpayers earning more than £1m a year has almost doubled in the past two years, prompting economists to claim that the highest-earning section of the population has bounced back from the financial crash.

Official figures reveal that 18,000 people now earn at least £1m – the highest number recorded by HM Revenue & Customs. In 2010-11, 10,000 earned more than £1m, and in 1999-2000 there were only 4,000 earning such a salary.

There is also growth further down the salary brackets, with 5,000 more earning £500,000 to £1m in 2012-13 compared with 2010-11, an extra 31,000 earning £200,000 to £500,000, and 7,000 more earning £150,000 to £200,000.

The figures will increase concerns that the trends of the 1990s and early 2000s are continuing, with a growing disparity between the top-earning 1%, many of whom work in finance, and the rest of the workforce. In sectors such as manufacturing, construction and hospitality salaries have been squeezed in recent years. A recent report showed that if low to middle earnings were to rise by the 1.1% a year above inflation achieved in the past, average annual household incomes in this group would take until 2023 to reach £22,000 – the equivalent of where they stood in 2008.

In stark contrast, Charles Shaker, a financial adviser and private wealth manager who was said by one of his employers to be "focused on ultra-high net worth individuals", was photographed last week spending £330,000 on a 30l bottle of champagne at the Monaco grand prix.

The HMRC figures emerged as Boston Consulting Group also suggested that Britain has just over 1,000 ultra-high net worth households – those with more than $100m (£65m) in private financial wealth, not including property. Matthew Whittaker, senior economist at the Resolution Foundation, said the HMRC figures were a pointer that the super-rich had bounced back from the financial crisis and that a promised rebalancing of the economy had failed to materialise.

"It is a continuation of a trend. Inequality grew massively during the 1980s in particular, and that was what we traditionally think of as inequality. The middle moved away from the bottom and the top moved away from the middle, so we got more stretched as a society," said Whittaker.

"If you look from the mid-1990s onwards, you don't see that any more; there is a compression of inequality. You have the minimum wage, so the bottom gained some ground on the middle and, for most people in the bottom three quarters or so, wage growth pretty much stalled from 2003. No one moved away from anyone else. But hidden behind all that is a new phase of inequality, where the top 10% – but more particularly the top 1% – are moving away from the rest of society."

The figures prompted Dave Prentis, general secretary of Unison, to call for a rethink on the government's cut in the top rate of tax. The chancellor, George Osborne, has defended the reduction of the tax rate from 50p to 45p for those earning more than £150,000 on the basis that it made little money for the exchequer. However, Unison believes that the rise in the number of wealthy taxpayers suggests that a 50p tax rate could have reaped more than £4bn for the Treasury if applied to thousands now in the top salary brackets.

Prentis said: "We have a government that is completely out of touch with the public mood. These figures show the chancellor diverting a massive amount of money into the pockets of the very rich, at the same time as making massive cuts to welfare and public services – it is immoral.

"There is an alternative to the government's no-hope policies," he said. "All that money could have been used to stop the cuts and inject some life into our failing economy."

The Guardian

I guess it's hard to take news like that when the rest of the country is suffering with austerity.

stuey Online
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Re: The Coalition Government
Reply #1364 : June 03, 2013, 03:24:38 PM »
Super-rich on rise as number of £1m-plus earners doubles
Campaigners say inequality gap is widening as 18,000 people earn more than £1m

The number of taxpayers earning more than £1m a year has almost doubled in the past two years, prompting economists to claim that the highest-earning section of the population has bounced back from the financial crash.

Official figures reveal that 18,000 people now earn at least £1m – the highest number recorded by HM Revenue & Customs. In 2010-11, 10,000 earned more than £1m, and in 1999-2000 there were only 4,000 earning such a salary.

There is also growth further down the salary brackets, with 5,000 more earning £500,000 to £1m in 2012-13 compared with 2010-11, an extra 31,000 earning £200,000 to £500,000, and 7,000 more earning £150,000 to £200,000.

The figures will increase concerns that the trends of the 1990s and early 2000s are continuing, with a growing disparity between the top-earning 1%, many of whom work in finance, and the rest of the workforce. In sectors such as manufacturing, construction and hospitality salaries have been squeezed in recent years. A recent report showed that if low to middle earnings were to rise by the 1.1% a year above inflation achieved in the past, average annual household incomes in this group would take until 2023 to reach £22,000 – the equivalent of where they stood in 2008.

In stark contrast, Charles Shaker, a financial adviser and private wealth manager who was said by one of his employers to be "focused on ultra-high net worth individuals", was photographed last week spending £330,000 on a 30l bottle of champagne at the Monaco grand prix.

The HMRC figures emerged as Boston Consulting Group also suggested that Britain has just over 1,000 ultra-high net worth households – those with more than $100m (£65m) in private financial wealth, not including property. Matthew Whittaker, senior economist at the Resolution Foundation, said the HMRC figures were a pointer that the super-rich had bounced back from the financial crisis and that a promised rebalancing of the economy had failed to materialise.

"It is a continuation of a trend. Inequality grew massively during the 1980s in particular, and that was what we traditionally think of as inequality. The middle moved away from the bottom and the top moved away from the middle, so we got more stretched as a society," said Whittaker.

"If you look from the mid-1990s onwards, you don't see that any more; there is a compression of inequality. You have the minimum wage, so the bottom gained some ground on the middle and, for most people in the bottom three quarters or so, wage growth pretty much stalled from 2003. No one moved away from anyone else. But hidden behind all that is a new phase of inequality, where the top 10% – but more particularly the top 1% – are moving away from the rest of society."

The figures prompted Dave Prentis, general secretary of Unison, to call for a rethink on the government's cut in the top rate of tax. The chancellor, George Osborne, has defended the reduction of the tax rate from 50p to 45p for those earning more than £150,000 on the basis that it made little money for the exchequer. However, Unison believes that the rise in the number of wealthy taxpayers suggests that a 50p tax rate could have reaped more than £4bn for the Treasury if applied to thousands now in the top salary brackets.

Prentis said: "We have a government that is completely out of touch with the public mood. These figures show the chancellor diverting a massive amount of money into the pockets of the very rich, at the same time as making massive cuts to welfare and public services – it is immoral.

"There is an alternative to the government's no-hope policies," he said. "All that money could have been used to stop the cuts and inject some life into our failing economy."

The Guardian

I guess it's hard to take news like that when the rest of the country is suffering with austerity.


Your dyed in the wool Tory's are bucking the trend surprise, surprise as their divide and confuse policy's bear fruit.

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Re: The Coalition Government
Reply #1365 : June 06, 2013, 05:57:57 PM »
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-22785282

Oh dear Labour. Admitting to the Conservative agenda showing their weakness on welfare debate. No doubts as to what party is pulling the strings on the issues of public spending.

And yet we still don't have a clue what Ed Miliband is talking about.
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Re: The Coalition Government
Reply #1366 : June 08, 2013, 02:03:54 PM »

Team Brown-stuff

LABOUR’s Ed Miliband and Ed Balls have finally woken up to corporate tax avoidance, the former taking the not-very bold step of laying into Google and the latter setting out some tentative policies to deal with the problem. As with the financial crisis, what neither has addressed is their role in creating the mess in the first place.

Both were intimates of chancellor Gordon Brown from the early days of the New Labour government: Miliband as his special adviser until 2002; Balls as his chief economic adviser before he himself became an MP in 2005. This was the period in which British tax avoidance opportunities were radically opened up – firstly in 1998 with the scrapping of corporation tax on company dividends which had ensured that companies paid at least some tax; but equally importantly through New Labour’s “light touch” approach to tax administration and financial regulation.

Conspicuously failed to extract the tax
Fast forward several years and these moves have brought protesters on to the streets and sparked parliamentary campaigns. Vodafone and Goldman Sachs won their infamous dodgy tax deals, while HM Revenue & Customs conspicuously failed to extract the tax it could, even under flawed tax laws, from the likes of Starbucks, Google, Amazon and others in scandals that are as much “light touch” legacies as Northern Rock and RBS.

The Brown crew’s neglect of the tax system extended beyond corporate tax to super-rich individuals too, as the “non-domiciled” tax break that allows some of the wealthiest to escape tax on offshore income was extended, despite promises to end it, and as private equity bosses were given tax rates famously lower then their cleaners.

Suspect contracts
One particular, and so far under-reported, series of tax scandals stands out as a monument to team Brown, however: the sale of Britain’s public assets to tax havens in the service of tax avoidance.

The first big one was the sale of the country’s tax offices to Bermudan company Mapeley Steps Ltd (Eyes passim ad nauseam). This was swiftly followed by an exodus under what is now just another tax avoider’s plaything: the private finance initiative. No sooner had these suspect contracts been signed than they began to be traded, with explicit official encouragement, and the most enticing places to sell them to were offshore havens. Thus it is that the owners of some serious British public infrastructure have for years been earning income from them tax-free offshore. The Home Office, would you believe, is owned by a company that pays interest to its parent company, HSBC Infrastructure Ltd, in Guernsey. Both the Ministry of Defence headquarters and the Treasury buildings are a quarter-owned from the Channel Islands under similarly tax-driven arrangements. None of the contracts concerned has paid tax even though, under Treasury rules, they were signed off as value for money on the basis that they would.

Economics class
A number of PFI hospitals, including the Norfolk and Norwich whose notorious refinancing was called “the unacceptable face of capitalism” by the public accounts committee, are also at least partly owned offshore, as are more than 200 of Britain’s state schools. Among them, owned 50 percent by the HSBC company in Guernsey, is Haverstock School in Camden, alma mater of one Ed Miliband. Perhaps the economics class could invite their illustrious Old Boy back to give a talk on how this could have happened.

http://www.private-eye.co.uk/sections.php?section_link=hp_sauce&issue=1341

Private Eye revealing the hypocrisies of the political class and the Labour Party once again.


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Re: The Coalition Government
Reply #1367 : June 26, 2013, 10:29:23 PM »


 :f_doh: :mad:

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Re: The Coalition Government
Reply #1368 : June 28, 2013, 01:32:38 AM »
:lmao:

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Re: The Coalition Government
Reply #1369 : June 28, 2013, 06:54:51 PM »
Is "lean English" street wording for some sort of new dance move? Sounds like a new Gangnum Style.

They say our days are numbered, we're not famous anymore, but scousers rule the country like we've always done before...

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Re: The Coalition Government
Reply #1370 : July 15, 2013, 02:14:51 AM »



Tory MP Andrew Selous spells 'learn' wrongly in tweet supporting benefits cut for those who cannot speak English

A Tory MP made himself a laughing stock yesterday when he botched a toadying message welcoming the Government’s benefits clampdown.

People who cannot speak English will have their benefits cut unless they learn it under plans announced by George Osborne.

Andrew Selous, Conservative MP for South West Bedfordshire, took to Twitter to welcome the idea.

However, Mr Selous typed: “Strongly support the loss of benefits unless claimants lean English.”

Others on the social media site mocked the MP for the blunder, which he quickly deleted.

Duncan Hothersall said: "Were did you lean to rite so good?"

Louise Stowell asked the MP: "Lean English – is that a new inspirational business title?"

And Jill Segger said: “You might just like to take [a] second look at that tweet.”

She added: “And a second look at government cuts to language classes.”


http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/andrew-selous-spells-learn-wrongly-2001791
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Re: The Coalition Government
Reply #1371 : July 15, 2013, 12:55:58 PM »


The Tory patrician hierarchy has failed. If the Conservative Party doesn't hand power to ordinary people, it will die

When we Conservatives “won” the 2010 General Election, we did so by getting a smaller share of the vote than we gained in 1945, when we went down to a Labour landslide. Such has been the long-term decline in Tory fortunes, what we today regard as a peak of electoral achievement would have once seemed like a disastrous trough.

Except of course, we did not win the 2010 election. Our party leadership obtained ministerial office after polling day by entering into a coalition with the Liberal Democrats. Unless we reverse a long term downward trend for the Conservative party, coalition could be the best it gets.

In towns and cities across the country where we once used to win elections, we don't even come second any more. After years of defeat and retreat into the South East of England, are we not in danger of ending up as a kind of English version of Italy’s Northern League? Regional in reach, not even aspiring to galvanise beyond a narrow core of supporters.

You don’t need to be a genius to recognise the problem. Thus far, no one in the Tory party seems to have found the answer. That’s why I believe that the launch today of a new campaign group, Renewal, could be so important.

“The key is energy bills,” some will tell us. “We need to focus on the cost of living and fuel prices,” say others. Many of Renewal’s anti-corporatism policy proposals are great. Yet decades of Tory failure in, say, the North East, or in urban Britain, are not going to be reversed by a tranche of policy proposals alone.

What we also need is a change in the culture of the Conservative Party. For too long we have been a Westminster-based party, run by a small hierarchy, with a few local franchises. What we need instead is to be an open platform, controlled by local people. Those who live in, say the North East, or urban Britain, should select local candidates and control the local Tory brand. I have a chapter in Renewal’s publication that suggests how this real modernisation agenda might be done.

Decades of patrician Toryism run out of SW1 have failed. What we need instead is insurgent Conservatism; anti big corporate interests and politics-as-usual in Westminster. Fiercely in favour of ordinary folk trying to make the most out of life.

http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/douglascarswellmp/100226040/the-tory-patrician-hierarchy-has-failed-if-the-conservative-party-doesnt-hand-power-to-ordinary-people-it-will-die/

Interesting and honest assessment by Douglas Carswell MP of the way that party is run in the UK. The Labour Party may be going through a tough period at the moment but it's worth noting the major structural problems of the Conservative Party - arguably far more problematic than any other party in the UK is dealing with at the moment. It's hard to see the Conservative Party ever regaining power on its own in its current state both ideologically and structurally.

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Re: The Coalition Government
Reply #1372 : July 15, 2013, 01:26:17 PM »

Interesting and honest assessment by Douglas Carswell MP of the way that party is run in the UK. The Labour Party may be going through a tough period at the moment but it's worth noting the major structural problems of the Conservative Party - arguably far more problematic than any other party in the UK is dealing with at the moment. It's hard to see the Conservative Party ever regaining power on its own in its current state both ideologically and structurally.



An interesting piece indeed in describing the Tory party as an outdated concept whose only path to power is an alliance with an also ran toothless Liberal organisation.
Shuffling about with presentation issues in order to transform the party of the rich will do nothing but further alienate an electorate who see through the deceit and moneymaking exploits of the millionaires rows on the Tory section of the houses of ''commons.''
Apart from the illusional south eastern Tory heartland which contains the wealth and wants to keep it that way, the mass of the UK is anti-Tory and they still have not won a general election for 20 years and counting.

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Re: The Coalition Government
Reply #1373 : July 15, 2013, 04:14:41 PM »
An interesting piece indeed in describing the Tory party as an outdated concept whose only path to power is an alliance with an also ran toothless Liberal organisation.
Shuffling about with presentation issues in order to transform the party of the rich will do nothing but further alienate an electorate who see through the deceit and moneymaking exploits of the millionaires rows on the Tory section of the houses of ''commons.''
Apart from the illusional south eastern Tory heartland which contains the wealth and wants to keep it that way, the mass of the UK is anti-Tory and they still have not won a general election for 20 years and counting.

I think the failure in 2010 to win the general election was alarming to a lot of back bench Tory MPs like Carswell which makes it even more stunning the lack of effort by Cameron and his lot to make greater pushes towards those areas which just will not vote Tory. The reality is that it will not be Cameron who will undertake such changes. He's very much created his own little 'party within a party' much to the annoyance and indeed the detriment of most of his MPs and the whole country. Cameron's club politics is cringe worthy to say the least. A lot of Conservative Party members and MPs would be more than happy to dispense of his leadership right now if given the chance because they know they're not being given a look in and secondly they know the situation could be and perhaps should be a whole lot better when you consider the fact that most people don't believe the Labour opposition to be anywhere near good enough at this moment in time.
« Last Edit: July 15, 2013, 04:21:13 PM by Frankly, Mr Shankly »
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Re: The Coalition Government
Reply #1374 : July 15, 2013, 05:11:10 PM »
Cameron et al seem completely oblivious to the fact that his party has failed to win a general election for 20 years and unbelievably are veering further right of centre.
A party within a party is unerringly accurate in describing the disjointed Tory clamour that exist at this moment in time, amazingly the gambit runs from the totally disillusioned Douglas Carswell MP to Cameron and his Thatcherite clan who inhabit some Malice in Toryland make believe world of majority's in parliament, held together by a garden gnome called Clegg.
From recent encounters in the house I would suggest that Milliband is getting more accomplished by the sitting and is proving a match for Cameron and his whimsy bluster.

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Re: The Coalition Government
Reply #1375 : July 15, 2013, 10:11:40 PM »
Cameron et al seem completely oblivious to the fact that his party has failed to win a general election for 20 years and unbelievably are veering further right of centre.
A party within a party is unerringly accurate in describing the disjointed Tory clamour that exist at this moment in time, amazingly the gambit runs from the totally disillusioned Douglas Carswell MP to Cameron and his Thatcherite clan who inhabit some Malice in Toryland make believe world of majority's in parliament, held together by a garden gnome called Clegg.
From recent encounters in the house I would suggest that Milliband is getting more accomplished by the sitting and is proving a match for Cameron and his whimsy bluster.

Carswell, while I don't agree with his politics, is in the right area as to where the problems of that party lie. I'm sure he and many others regret not electing David Davis back in 2005 a far more worthy and capable leader I'm sure. Cameron on the other hand is still trying to escape that 'heir to Blair' tag in my view but arguably more vague and clearly a lot more weaker than Blair ever was. And as much as Ed Miliband has improved at the dispatch box he and his front bench gang still appear to be utterly insipid in every way particularly that air head Harriet Harman.
« Last Edit: July 15, 2013, 10:18:37 PM by Frankly, Mr Shankly »
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Re: The Coalition Government
Reply #1376 : July 30, 2013, 01:04:07 PM »
Serco: the company that is running Britain

From prisons to rail franchises and even London's Boris bikes, Serco is a giant global corporation that has hoovered up outsourced government contracts. Now the NHS is firmly in its sights. But it stands accused of mismanagement, lying and even charging for non-existent work.

In May this year, a huge company listed on the London Stock Exchange found itself in the midst of controversy about a prison it runs for the government – Thameside, a newly built jail next to Belmarsh, in south-east London. A report by Her Majesty's Inspectorate found that 60% of its inmates were locked up all day, and there were only "vague plans to restore the prison to normality". The prison campaign group the Howard League for Penal Reform talked about conditions that were "truly alarming".

Two months later, the same company was the subject of a high- profile report published by the House Of Commons public accounts committee, prompted by the work of Guardian journalist Felicity Lawrence. This time, attention was focused on how it was managing out-of-hours GP services in Cornwall, and massive failings that had first surfaced two years before. Again, the verdict was damning: data had been falsified, national standards had not been met, there was a culture of "lying and cheating", and the service offered to the public was simply "not good enough".

Three weeks ago, there came grimmer news. Thanks to its contracts for tagging offenders, the company was now the focus of panic at the Ministry of Justice, where it had been discovered that it was one of two contractors that had somehow overcharged the government for its services, possibly by as much as £50m; there were suggestions that one in six of the tags that the state had paid for did not actually exist. How this happened is still unclear, but justice secretary Chris Grayling has said the allegations represent something "wholly indefensible and unacceptable".

The firm that links these three stories together is Serco. Its range of activities, here and abroad, is truly mind-boggling, taking in no end of things that were once done by the state, but are now outsourced to private companies. Amazingly, its contracts with government are subject to what's known as "commercial confidentiality" and as a private firm it's not open to Freedom of Information requests, so looking into the details of what it does is fraught with difficulty.

But the basic facts are plain enough. As well as five British prisons and the tags attached to over 8,000 English and Welsh offenders, Serco sees to two immigration removal centres, at Colnbrook near Heathrow, and Yarl's Wood in Bedfordshire. You'll also see its logo on the Docklands Light Railway and Woolwich ferry, and is a partner in both Liverpool's Merseyrail network, and the Northern Rail franchise, which sees to trains that run in a huge area between the North Midlands and English-Scottish border.

Serco runs school inspections in parts of England, speed cameras all over the UK, and the National Nuclear Laboratory, based at the Sellafield site in Cumbria. It also holds the contracts for the management of the UK's ballistic missile early warning system on the Yorkshire moors, the running of the Manchester Aquatics Centre, and London's "Boris bikes".

As evidenced by the story of how it handled out-of-hours care in Cornwall, it is also an increasingly big player in a health service that is being privatised at speed, in the face of surprisingly little public opposition: among its array of NHS contracts is a new role seeing to "community health services" in Suffolk, which involves 1,030 employees. The company is also set to bid for an even bigger healthcare contract in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough: the NHS's single-biggest privatisation – or, if you prefer, "outsourcing" – to date, which could be worth over £1bn.

But even this is only a fraction of the story. Among their scores of roles across the planet, Serco is responsible for air traffic control in the United Arab Emirates, parking-meter services in Chicago, driving tests in Ontario, and an immigration detention centre on Christmas Island, run on behalf of those well-known friends of overseas visitors the Australian government.

In the US, the company has just been awarded a controversial $1.25bn contract by that country's Department of Health. All told, its operations suggest some real-life version of the fantastical mega-corporations that have long been invented by fiction writers; a more benign version of the Tyrell Corporation from Blade Runner, say, or one of those creations from James Bond movies whose name always seems to end with the word "industries".

The strangest thing, though, is the gap between Serco's size and how little the public knows about it. Not for nothing does so much coverage of its work include the sentence "the biggest company you've never heard of".

I first heard Serco's name about eight years ago, when I was just starting to understand the amazing growth of what are now called "public service companies". Once I started looking, their logos were everywhere, suggesting a shadow state that has since grown ever-bigger. Their names seemed anonymously stylised, in keeping with the sense that they seemed both omnipresent, and barely known: Interserve, Sodexo, Capita, the Compass Group.

Serco is among the biggest of them all. At the last count, its annual pre-tax profits were up 27%, at £302m. In 2012 alone, its British workforce grew by 10,000, to 53,000 people (tellingly, as many as 90% of them are said to be former civil servant employees). In terms of employees, that makes it more than twice as large as the BBC, and around 20% bigger than Philip Green's Arcadia group. A very significant player, in other words, and one that has come a long way since its foundation 1929, when it was a branch of the American RCA corporation called RCA Services Ltd, involved in the then booming UK cinema industry. It was renamed Serco in 1987, after a management buy-out, and floated on the stock exchange the following year. In the 25 subsequent years, during which the UK has grown ever-fouder of outsourcing and privatisation, Serco has grown at an amazing rate.

The current chief executive of the global Serco Group is 49-year-old Chris Hyman, born in Durban, South Africa. His annual remuneration is around £700,000, plus bonuses; in 2011, the value of his total package rose 18%, to £1.86m (the company's finance director had to slum it at £948,295).

In 2010, Hyman was given a CBE for services to business and charity; he is also an enthusiastic fan of motor racing and an evangelical Christian. Four years ago, he was asked about his company's very low profile, and he said this: "We had a dilemma – what do we do with the Serco name. We are proud of it. We thought we needed billboards at airports and places like that, to be seen with Tiger Woods on. But we worked out very quickly that is not what we are meant to do. We are meant to be known by the 5,000 not the five billion. The people who serve the people need to choose who supplies the service. We are delighted when the public knows who we are, but really, we need to be known by the people who make decisions."

When Serco made its bid to run NHS community-health services in Suffolk – district nursing, physiotherapy, OT, end-of-life palliative care, wheelchair services – it reckoned it could do it for £140m over three years – £16m less than the existing NHS "provider" had managed, which would eventually allow for their standard profit margin of around 6% a year. When it started to become clear that Serco was the frontrunner, there was some opposition, but perhaps not nearly enough. "Suffolk isn't the most politically active part of the country," says one local insider. "And the staff were very lackadaisical. It was: 'NHS Suffolk wouldn't made a bad decision.' So it was hard to get a campaign going."

Serco was officially awarded the contract in October 2012, which meant that hundreds of staff would leave the NHS, and become company employees. Within weeks, the company proposed a huge reorganisation, which involved getting rid of one in six jobs. This has since come down to one in seven, two thirds of which will apparently go via natural wastage. In terms of their pay and conditions, the hundreds of people who have been transferred from the NHS to Serco are protected by provisions laid down by the last government, but it is already becoming clear that many new staff are on inferior contracts: as one local source puts it, "they've got less annual leave, less sick pay … it's significantly worse."

Meanwhile, other people are reportedly quitting their jobs, and the service given to patients is said to be getting worse. "In my team alone, we're 50% down on staffing hours compared with last year," says one former NHS worker, who provides home-care to patients who are largely elderly. Thanks to poor morale, she says that the team in which she works has lost around a third of its staff, and she is also having to see to administrative tasks that were previously carried out by someone else: in addition, she claims, support for a new IT regime is "farcical".

"We've still got the same number of patients," she says, "so the workload has massively increased." As a result, she and her colleagues are having to cut people out of their previous entitlement to treatment at home. "That completely goes against our ethics," she says, "but that's what we're having to do."

The NHS is a relatively new area of controversy for Serco, but concerns about their practices run across many other areas. Right now, the controversy over alleged overcharging, focused on both Serco and its fellow tagging- contractor G4S, seems to have only just begun. When the news was made public, 8% was wiped off Serco's share price. The Cabinet Office has announced a review "into government-held G4S and Serco contracts to ensure that contracts are well-managed and in good order", which will report in the autumn. Work for the British government accounts for 40% of Serco's revenues; to quote from the Daily Telegraph. "Without Serco, Britain would struggle to go to war". That gives you some idea of how deeply its work penetrates the state, and how unthinkable any kind of corporate crisis would be.

Margaret Hodge, the former Labour minister who now chairs the public accounts committee, clearly thinks that all these stories point to huge issues. She talks about "the inability of government to contract-out in a way that protects the taxpayer's interest." The Cornwall out-of-hours story, she tells me, was reducible to "an absurd situation where you had a company seemingly lying about what it was doing, but there was nothing in the contract that could allow you to terminate it – indeed, they still appeared to be eligible for their bonus payments. It's quite extraordinary."

There are even bigger issues at stake, though. "There's also the inability of the public sector to monitor effectively," she says. "The Cornwall story came to light because of a Guardian journalist and a whole load of whistleblowers. Which is nuts: a crazy way for the public sector holding to account the private sector when it's delivering public services." Even her committee, she says, cannot break through a great wall of commercial confidentiality, and look at what the companies delivering pubic services are up to – not just in terms of their bids for public services and contracts with government, but such vital matters as their costs, and the profits they make from particular jobs.

Does she feel any guilt about the fact that companies such as Serco made their decisive breakthrough into public services when Labour was in power? There's a murmur of agreement. "I think we were as bad at managing this diversity of providers," she says. "But one of the things that gets me with this government is that they should have learned from our mistakes. What is becoming really clear to me … is that the Sercos, the A4s, the G4Ss, the Capitas – they're good at winning contracts, but too often, they're bad at running services."

And what of the incredible range of what Serco actually does, from school inspections to Boris bikes? "Interestingly, we are looking at this. The National Audit Office is doing work around the development of quasi-monopoly private providers, which is the world we're moving into. We don't really understand the size of their empires. We've got to start getting hold of this. It's a new phenomenon."

Once I'd spoken to Hodge, I got hold of one of Serco's "media relations team", and arranged to send him a few questions. On the subject of the out-of-hours GP fiasco in Cornwall, he quoted a response from the doctor in charge of their set-up. "It's really important that the local people in Cornwall do not lose confidence in this essential urgent care service," he said. "It is a valued part of the local NHS and we are proud of our professional team who provide it." A wider statement said the company had taken "swift and decisive action to put the situation right and apologised to the people of Cornwall", and made "a goodwill gesture to repay the bonus made [sic] to us in 2012, which we were under no obligation to do." All told, I was assured, their service "delivers a high standard against the national quality requirements".

On the allegations about what has happened since Serco took over community healthcare in Suffolk, and the claim that any new starters aside from clinical staff are on inferior terms and conditions, the same spokesperson said that such employees are "offered contracts in line with Serco standard terms and conditions which are market comparable". He denied that anyone had been cut out of treatment at home, said that the company had "recently realigned our clinical teams across Suffolk according to the needs of the areas in which they deliver care" and claimed that new IT systems are being implemented "slowly and carefully".

The controversy surrounding Thameside prison, they said, had been followed by "a series of initiatives" including a "gangs strategy", and measures to help prisoners with mental-health issues. Some people were now allowed to be outside their cells "during the core part of the day", and in August, Serco anticipated that this would be extended.

As for the ongoing story about overcharging for their tagging contract with the Ministry of Justice, Serco said this: "We are working with our customer, the Ministry of Justice [on] this matter so there is very little we can add at this stage." I was also directed to a statement from Chris Hyman, which said the company "will not tolerate poor practice and behaviour and wherever it is found we will put it right", and reminded that justice secretary Chris Grayling has said he so far has "no information to confirm dishonesty had taken place" on the part of either Serco or G4S.

There was one last question, concerning the amazing spread of what Serco sees to, from parking meters, through nuclear early warning systems, to an expanding share of the NHS. Is there any limit to the fields they work in?

"We operate in a range of markets and geographies," went its answer, "which means we are well placed to bring a wide range of experiences and knowledge to help customers with the challenges that they face."

That'll be a no, then.



http://www.theguardian.com/business/2013/jul/29/serco-biggest-company-never-heard-of
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Re: The Coalition Government
Reply #1377 : August 06, 2013, 01:24:45 PM »
Labour says workers thousands of pounds worse off

The average worker will lose a total of £6,600 in real terms during the coalition's term in government, the Labour Party says.

It is accusing David Cameron of having presided over more months of falling real wages since 2010 than any other prime minister in the past 50 years.

Based on its prediction, Labour said many workers had "never had it so bad".

But business minister Matthew Hancock said the previous government had been "disastrous" for the UK economy.

He added that the main job of the Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition - set to last until the general election of May 2015 - was to clear up Labour's "mess".

The UK economy grew by 0.6% in the three months to June, according to official figures, with the construction industry seeing a 0.9% improvement.

Labour has used data from the Office for National Statistics and projections from the Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) to come up with its standard-of-living figures. It says only one month of Mr Cameron's premiership has seen a rise in real wages.

The £6,660 figure is before tax and does not take account of benefit changes. It is based upon an OBR forecast that average annual wages will be £1,520 lower in 2015 - once adjusted for inflation - than they were in 2010, when the coalition government was formed.

Shadow treasury minister Chris Leslie said: "David Cameron will go down in history as a disastrous prime minister for people's living standards. He is totally out of touch, his economic policies have failed and the result is working families are massively out of pocket.

"By 2015, official forecasts show working people will have lost an average of £6,660 under five years of the Tories. Yet millionaires have got a huge tax cut from this government.

"Far from never having it so good, many working people have never had it so bad. Prices have risen faster than wages in 36 out of the 37 months since David Cameron has been in Downing Street. This is the worst performance of any prime minister on record.

"Labour would help middle and low income families right now, including a lower 10p starting rate of tax, action to tackle soaring energy bills and protecting tax credits for working families by reversing the tax cut for millionaires."

But Conservative business minister Matthew Hancock said: "Today's squeeze on living standards is a direct result of Labour's disastrous economic policy that got us into this mess.

"And if they were in government now, Labour would make hardworking people worse off. Their plan for more borrowing and more debt - exactly the same old Labour policy that got us into this mess in the first place - would mean soaring mortgage rates and higher bills.

"As the economy continues to recover we must ensure that - unlike under Labour - everyone who works hard has the chance to take part in that recovery and reach their potential.

"That's why we're taking 2.7 million out of income tax altogether, cutting income tax for millions more and fixing the welfare system so that it rewards hard work."



http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-23580075
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waltonl4 Offline
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Re: The Coalition Government
Reply #1378 : February 17, 2014, 03:21:13 PM »
Labour says workers thousands of pounds worse off

The average worker will lose a total of £6,600 in real terms during the coalition's term in government, the Labour Party says.

It is accusing David Cameron of having presided over more months of falling real wages since 2010 than any other prime minister in the past 50 years.

Based on its prediction, Labour said many workers had "never had it so bad".

But business minister Matthew Hancock said the previous government had been "disastrous" for the UK economy.

He added that the main job of the Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition - set to last until the general election of May 2015 - was to clear up Labour's "mess".

The UK economy grew by 0.6% in the three months to June, according to official figures, with the construction industry seeing a 0.9% improvement.

Labour has used data from the Office for National Statistics and projections from the Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) to come up with its standard-of-living figures. It says only one month of Mr Cameron's premiership has seen a rise in real wages.

The £6,660 figure is before tax and does not take account of benefit changes. It is based upon an OBR forecast that average annual wages will be £1,520 lower in 2015 - once adjusted for inflation - than they were in 2010, when the coalition government was formed.

Shadow treasury minister Chris Leslie said: "David Cameron will go down in history as a disastrous prime minister for people's living standards. He is totally out of touch, his economic policies have failed and the result is working families are massively out of pocket.

"By 2015, official forecasts show working people will have lost an average of £6,660 under five years of the Tories. Yet millionaires have got a huge tax cut from this government.

"Far from never having it so good, many working people have never had it so bad. Prices have risen faster than wages in 36 out of the 37 months since David Cameron has been in Downing Street. This is the worst performance of any prime minister on record.

"Labour would help middle and low income families right now, including a lower 10p starting rate of tax, action to tackle soaring energy bills and protecting tax credits for working families by reversing the tax cut for millionaires."

But Conservative business minister Matthew Hancock said: "Today's squeeze on living standards is a direct result of Labour's disastrous economic policy that got us into this mess.

"And if they were in government now, Labour would make hardworking people worse off. Their plan for more borrowing and more debt - exactly the same old Labour policy that got us into this mess in the first place - would mean soaring mortgage rates and higher bills.

"As the economy continues to recover we must ensure that - unlike under Labour - everyone who works hard has the chance to take part in that recovery and reach their potential.

"That's why we're taking 2.7 million out of income tax altogether, cutting income tax for millions more and fixing the welfare system so that it rewards hard work."



http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-23580075


why is this news .If Labour said the Conservatives were doing a great job now that would be news.Bad as each other and that is the sad news.