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      The Film Discussion Thread.

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      Baconbutty
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      Re: The Film Discussion Thread.
      Reply #5160 : Jul 26, 2017 07:03:09 am »
      Watched a film called The Shawshank Redemption last night. Very good. Not sure if anyone would have heard of it though.
      srslfc
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      Re: The Film Discussion Thread.
      Reply #5161 : Jul 26, 2017 09:28:01 am »
      Watched a film called The Shawshank Redemption last night. Very good. Not sure if anyone would have heard of it though.

       ;D
      Shabs
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      Re: The Film Discussion Thread.
      Reply #5162 : Jul 26, 2017 10:02:26 am »
      srslfc
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      Re: The Film Discussion Thread.
      Reply #5163 : Jul 26, 2017 11:16:04 am »

      While we're at it I'll recommend a little known Mafia film called The Godfather.

      Well worth checking out if you can track it down.
      Shabs
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      Re: The Film Discussion Thread.
      Reply #5164 : Jul 26, 2017 04:56:38 pm »
      See some french press complaining about the lack of french involvement,  considering the number of their trooos involved,  suppose it is better than the guy at usa today who complained about the lack of black and women actors in dunkirk

      How Christopher Nolan's 'Dunkirk' missed the chance to honour Indians’ role in WWII.

      Four companies of the Royal Indian Army Service Corps were on Dunkirk’s beaches during the film’s period.

      Touted as a masterpiece, Christopher Nolan's war epic Dunkirk has been garnering rave reviews from film critics and movie watchers alike.

      Set during the World War II, the film chronicles the evacuation of British soldiers who were cornered on the beaches of Dunkirk (Dunkerque) in France between late May and early June 1940. Nearly 4,00,000 men of the Allied Forces had been pushed there to the very edge of land by the Germans.



      While Dunkirk has been hailed a cinematic showpiece, there’s a significant absence that has come to light since the film’s release – there’s no mention of the role that the Indian Army played in the events depicted and, by extension, in the war.

      John Broich writes in Slate that there were four companies of the Royal Indian Army Service Corps on Dunkirk's beaches in the time the movie is set.

      "Observers said they were particularly cool under fire and well organized during the retreat. They weren’t large in number, maybe a few hundred among hundreds of thousands, but their appearance in the film would have provided a good reminder of how utterly central the role of the Indian Army was in the war. Their service meant the difference between victory and defeat. In fact, while Britain and other allies were licking their wounds after Dunkirk, the Indian Army picked up the slack in North Africa and the Middle East," he observes in the piece.

      Giving a brief timeline of events, Manimugdha S Sharma explains in The Times of India that in 1939, the British Army was probably the only fully mechanised army in the world. However, the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) had to rely on animal transport when it went to France.

      "Unlike the British, the Indian Army was still not mechanised. It had 96 infantry battalions and 18 cavalry regiments with only two being ordered to give up horses for tanks a little before the war. So the pack animals and their handlers had to come from India," she writes.



      Indian troops in Burma in 1944; By No 9 Army Film & Photographic Unit, via Wikimedia Commons

      That was how four Indian Animal Transport companies, called Force K-6 – which were part of the Royal Indian Army Service Corps – were dispatched to France in December 1936. These men were mostly Punjabi Muslims and Pathans primarily hailing from areas that now are a part of Pakistan.

      While three of the four Force K-6 companies were evacuated, the personnel of one company were taken prisoner by the Germans, and are said to have died in their prisoner-of-war camps.

      Their valiant effort was recognised in the form of a citation of Indian Distinguished Service Medal awarded to Jemadar Maula Dad Khan, who was a Viceroy's Commissioned Officer, the TOI report further states.

      "On 24 May 1940 when approaching Dunkerque, Jemadar Maula Dad Khan showed magnificent courage, coolness and decision. When his troop was shelled from the ground and bombed from the air by the enemy he promptly reorganised his men and animals, got them off the road and under cover under extremely difficult conditions.It was due to this initiative and the confidence he inspired that it was possible to extricate his troop without loss in men or animals," the citation reads.

      http://www.thenewsminute.com/article/how-christopher-nolans-dunkirk-missed-chance-honour-indians-role-wwii-65622
      racerx34
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      Re: The Film Discussion Thread.
      Reply #5165 : Jul 26, 2017 05:18:34 pm »
      Hans Zimmer is the music producer.. Proper legend him.

      Watching this at IMAX.

      Say no more. I'm sold.
      Zimmer and Nolan. DAMN
      Baconbutty
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      Re: The Film Discussion Thread.
      Reply #5166 : Jul 26, 2017 10:40:28 pm »
      While we're at it I'll recommend a little known Mafia film called The Godfather.

      Well worth checking out if you can track it down.

      Is that the one with the arl fella and he strokes that cat?
      Swab
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      Re: The Film Discussion Thread.
      Reply #5167 : Jul 27, 2017 11:39:59 am »
      Is that the one with the arl fella and he strokes that cat?

       :laugh:
      LFCexiled
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      Re: The Film Discussion Thread.
      Reply #5168 : Jul 27, 2017 11:43:56 am »
      Is that the one with the arl fella and he strokes that cat?

      Nope, that's danger mouse.

      I think.
      HUYTON RED
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      Re: The Film Discussion Thread.
      Reply #5169 : Jul 27, 2017 03:28:46 pm »
      Is that the one with the arl fella and he strokes that cat?

      "Ah Mr Bond we've been expecting you"

      :lmao:
      RedPuppy
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      Re: The Film Discussion Thread.
      Reply #5170 : Jul 28, 2017 03:12:44 pm »
      Just got back from watching Dunkirk. Spoiler.

      For me it was a crock of sh*t. Opening scene, was it sunny, cloudy, misty? We had all 3.

      Was there time shifting? dusk, night and then straight back to sunny days.

      Architecture, cranes, buildings, water towers???? The boats, sure there was a fiberglass life boat, the battle ships looked very modern.

      The train carriage, looked as if it was from the 1990's, seriously melamine walls! back in the 80's they were still wood ffs.

      Could have been so much better, it's a 12A for a reason.
      « Last Edit: Jul 28, 2017 05:50:31 pm by RedPuppy »
      HUYTON RED
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      Re: The Film Discussion Thread.
      Reply #5171 : Jul 29, 2017 01:46:45 am »
      Just got back from watching Dunkirk. Spoiler.

      For me it was a crock of sh*t. Opening scene, was it sunny, cloudy, misty? We had all 3.

      Was there time shifting? dusk, night and then straight back to sunny days.

      Architecture, cranes, buildings, water towers???? The boats, sure there was a fiberglass life boat, the battle ships looked very modern.

      The train carriage, looked as if it was from the 1990's, seriously melamine walls! back in the 80's they were still wood ffs.

      Could have been so much better, it's a 12A for a reason.

      Watched it the other night, thought it was good, although I wanted to hum the Great Escape theme tune right at the end!!
      Frankly, Mr Shankly
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      Re: The Film Discussion Thread.
      Reply #5172 : Jul 29, 2017 07:50:25 pm »
      No takers for The Emoji Movie then?
      LFCexiled
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      Re: The Film Discussion Thread.
      Reply #5173 : Jul 29, 2017 08:00:30 pm »

      3% on rotten tomatoes.

      My kids will love it.
      lester76
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      Re: The Film Discussion Thread.
      Reply #5174 : Jul 29, 2017 08:19:52 pm »
      Baby Driver
      Brilliant film
      Strong recommendation
      Also just watched Dunkirk
      Loved it. Harrowing stuff. Technically brilliant piece of film making. Some excellent casting.
      Just lacked a little on the emotional side and nolans desire to shoot as much 'in camera' as opposed to using CGI leads to some of the scenes lacking some of the epic scale that I felt it needed.
      bazspeedman
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      Re: The Film Discussion Thread.
      Reply #5175 : Jul 31, 2017 04:18:06 pm »
      Just got back from watching Dunkirk. Spoiler.

      For me it was a crock of sh*t. Opening scene, was it sunny, cloudy, misty? We had all 3.

      Was there time shifting? dusk, night and then straight back to sunny days.

      Architecture, cranes, buildings, water towers???? The boats, sure there was a fiberglass life boat, the battle ships looked very modern.

      The train carriage, looked as if it was from the 1990's, seriously melamine walls! back in the 80's they were still wood ffs.

      Could have been so much better, it's a 12A for a reason.

      Mate how did you not get the movie keeps cutting between 3 different timelines it's explained in the opening 5 minutes??

      Also the movie is noted for using actual WW2 vehicles and planes.

      The civilian boat they used for the sea timeline was built in 1930.

      The planes are completely remodelled WW2 RAF spitfires.

      The movie was so realistic I felt I was actually there at times.

      Incredible movie I expect it to sweep the Oscars and go down as a modern masterpiece.
      stuey
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      Re: The Film Discussion Thread.
      Reply #5176 : Aug 03, 2017 10:50:12 pm »
      Baby Driver
      Brilliant film
      Strong recommendation
      Also just watched Dunkirk
      Loved it. Harrowing stuff. Technically brilliant piece of film making. Some excellent casting.
      Just lacked a little on the emotional side and nolans desire to shoot as much 'in camera' as opposed to using CGI leads to some of the scenes lacking some of the epic scale that I felt it needed.


      Just back from seeing Dunkirk, excellent movie.
      Got the feeling it was made along the lines of a documentary-drama, jaw dropping effects
      RedPuppy
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      Re: The Film Discussion Thread.
      Reply #5177 : Aug 06, 2017 03:11:30 pm »
      Mate how did you not get the movie keeps cutting between 3 different timelines it's explained in the opening 5 minutes??

      Also the movie is noted for using actual WW2 vehicles and planes.

      The civilian boat they used for the sea timeline was built in 1930.

      The planes are completely remodelled WW2 RAF spitfires.

      The movie was so realistic I felt I was actually there at times.

      Incredible movie I expect it to sweep the Oscars and go down as a modern masterpiece.

      I didn't mention the vehicles or planes.
      I didn't mention the civilian boat.

      I did mention the architecture and cranes.
      I did mention the train carriage.
      I did mention the battle ships.
      I did mention the weather.

      There was 300,000 evacuated, the film did not have 300,000 on the beach.

      Anachronisms
      The film shows several vehicles of a later second world war type. Understandably, period vehicles are difficult to come by, the vast majority having been left behind at the time.

      The Luftwaffe did not start painting fighter aircraft nose cones yellow until later in 1940. However Christopher Nolan has admitted this was done deliberately to make the German aircraft easier to identify by the audience.

      Modern port unloading cranes in sweeping shots looking inland, including when the plane glides down the beach to a landing.

      The railway carriages in the final scenes date from the 1950s and have seat patterns from the 1980s.

      There are two instances when the German Heinkel He-111 comes under attack by a British Supermarine Spitfire. Both times, the Heinkel sounds like it fires cannons in its defense. The Heinkel He-111 H-3 variant, the one used during the time period, did not have cannons as defensive armament. It was armed with MG 17 Machine Guns as defensive armament.

      During the scenes shot in Weymouth on a couple of occasions you can see the top of the Weymouth "Sealife Tower" which was built circa 2012.

      On a few occasions the cranes of the container terminal and chimneys of the Arcelor Mittal plant in the modern day port of Dunkirk are clearly visible in the background.

      Modern road signs and road markings can be seen in Weymouth.

      The Dunkirk promenade shows modern lamp posts with new lighting, which would not have been around in 1940.

      The Luftwaffe (German Air Force) fighter aircraft used during the time of the events at Dunkirk would most likely be the Messerschmitt Bf 109E. The plane used in the movie is a Hispano Aviación HA-1112, which is a Spanish variant of the Bf-109 introduced after the war, powered by the Rolls-Royce Merlin engine, like the Spitfire. HA-1112 are commonly used as substitutes for Bf 109s as they are almost identical in appearance save for the HA-1112's less-streamlined cowling.

      When the airplane is on the beach, there are two quick shots of the sand dunes, behind which modern container cranes can be seen jutting high into the air.

      In the background of many shots of Kenneth Branagh at the end of the Mole pier, a large blue and green warehouse can be clearly seen - not a 1940s building in construction.

      In the first scene, while running through the street, one of the houses on the right has a modern day aluminum frame on the facade.

      In the background of the scenes on the beach giant "modern" post 1970 container cranes can be clearly seen. These giant walkers were developed in the 1980s to facilitate removal of shipping containers and did not exist in 1940. They appear in the background of many scenes including the climatic final scene.

      Double glazed train windows and container cranes in Dunkirk port.

      When the Spitfire is shown landed on the beach, ship-to-shore container cranes are visible in the background above the sand dunes. This type of crane first came into use in the 1950's.
      http://www.imdb.com/title/tt5013056/trivia?tab=gf&ref_=tt_trv_gf

      Not realistic.
      HUYTON RED
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      Re: The Film Discussion Thread.
      Reply #5178 : Aug 06, 2017 03:16:17 pm »

      Hence why it's only a film, unless you want filmgoers walking out of the cinema with shellshock and ptsd!! :lmao:
      FATKOPITE10
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      Re: The Film Discussion Thread.
      Reply #5179 : Aug 06, 2017 03:23:26 pm »
      Hence why it's only a film, unless you want filmgoers walking out of the cinema with shellshock and ptsd!! :lmao:

      Should made them watconit on a beach under shellfire
      RedPuppy
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      Re: The Film Discussion Thread.
      Reply #5180 : Aug 06, 2017 03:24:09 pm »
      Hence why it's only a film, unless you want filmgoers walking out of the cinema with shellshock and ptsd!! :lmao:

      Nar, some of those mistakes are unforgivable, (not the story line), they did it in Saving Private Ryan, why not in Dunkirk?

      The Film, with GCI technology, could have been brilliant, but to allow modern day buildings visible is dreadfully amateurish, the train,and I know I'm banging on about this, but if Harry Potter can get an old wooden carriage then why not in this film, and the f**king cranes!
      stuey
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      Re: The Film Discussion Thread.
      Reply #5181 : Aug 06, 2017 03:50:33 pm »
      Did see the original Dunkirk movie in black and white when actual footage of the beach, soldiers, boats, planes etc was used.
      That would have been the only option to ensure 100% authenticity.
      While it was glaringly obvious that some of the finer detail had become a little obscure, the movie was an enjoyable, contemporary-ish take on a tragic, heroic and emotional event in WW2, some accuracy was lost but for me and it seemed the audience as a whole it didn't detract from the story.
      Frankly, Mr Shankly
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      Re: The Film Discussion Thread.
      Reply #5182 : Aug 06, 2017 04:06:30 pm »
      Nar, some of those mistakes are unforgivable, (not the story line), they did it in Saving Private Ryan, why not in Dunkirk?

      The Film, with GCI technology, could have been brilliant, but to allow modern day buildings visible is dreadfully amateurish, the train,and I know I'm banging on about this, but if Harry Potter can get an old wooden carriage then why not in this film, and the f**king cranes!

      Got to be honest - I'm no fan of CGI. Granted, if CGI is to be used then war films are the perfect genre to do so but there's definitely a tipping point that so many films have gone over with their usage of CGI.
      bazspeedman
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      Re: The Film Discussion Thread.
      Reply #5183 : Aug 06, 2017 11:59:36 pm »
      I didn't mention the vehicles or planes.
      I didn't mention the civilian boat.

      I did mention the architecture and cranes.
      I did mention the train carriage.
      I did mention the battle ships.
      I did mention the weather.

      There was 300,000 evacuated, the film did not have 300,000 on the beach.

      Anachronisms
      The film shows several vehicles of a later second world war type. Understandably, period vehicles are difficult to come by, the vast majority having been left behind at the time.

      The Luftwaffe did not start painting fighter aircraft nose cones yellow until later in 1940. However Christopher Nolan has admitted this was done deliberately to make the German aircraft easier to identify by the audience.

      Modern port unloading cranes in sweeping shots looking inland, including when the plane glides down the beach to a landing.

      The railway carriages in the final scenes date from the 1950s and have seat patterns from the 1980s.

      There are two instances when the German Heinkel He-111 comes under attack by a British Supermarine Spitfire. Both times, the Heinkel sounds like it fires cannons in its defense. The Heinkel He-111 H-3 variant, the one used during the time period, did not have cannons as defensive armament. It was armed with MG 17 Machine Guns as defensive armament.

      During the scenes shot in Weymouth on a couple of occasions you can see the top of the Weymouth "Sealife Tower" which was built circa 2012.

      On a few occasions the cranes of the container terminal and chimneys of the Arcelor Mittal plant in the modern day port of Dunkirk are clearly visible in the background.

      Modern road signs and road markings can be seen in Weymouth.

      The Dunkirk promenade shows modern lamp posts with new lighting, which would not have been around in 1940.

      The Luftwaffe (German Air Force) fighter aircraft used during the time of the events at Dunkirk would most likely be the Messerschmitt Bf 109E. The plane used in the movie is a Hispano Aviación HA-1112, which is a Spanish variant of the Bf-109 introduced after the war, powered by the Rolls-Royce Merlin engine, like the Spitfire. HA-1112 are commonly used as substitutes for Bf 109s as they are almost identical in appearance save for the HA-1112's less-streamlined cowling.

      When the airplane is on the beach, there are two quick shots of the sand dunes, behind which modern container cranes can be seen jutting high into the air.

      In the background of many shots of Kenneth Branagh at the end of the Mole pier, a large blue and green warehouse can be clearly seen - not a 1940s building in construction.

      In the first scene, while running through the street, one of the houses on the right has a modern day aluminum frame on the facade.

      In the background of the scenes on the beach giant "modern" post 1970 container cranes can be clearly seen. These giant walkers were developed in the 1980s to facilitate removal of shipping containers and did not exist in 1940. They appear in the background of many scenes including the climatic final scene.

      Double glazed train windows and container cranes in Dunkirk port.

      When the Spitfire is shown landed on the beach, ship-to-shore container cranes are visible in the background above the sand dunes. This type of crane first came into use in the 1950's.
      http://www.imdb.com/title/tt5013056/trivia?tab=gf&ref_=tt_trv_gf

      Not realistic.

      That aside great movie  ;)
      bmck
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      Re: The Film Discussion Thread.
      Reply #5184 : Aug 29, 2017 10:12:18 pm »
      Saw 'Baby Driver' on the 'big screen' the other night. Good popcorn stuff :)

      When I say 'big screen', it was the end of its run, and it was in a cinema that had an aisle on one side, and seats on the left ... just 5 seats wide, 12 rows! Smallest cinema was ever in.  Was packed!!!!   Was expecting the place to ourselves
      HUYTON RED
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      Re: The Film Discussion Thread.
      Reply #5185 : Aug 31, 2017 12:27:44 am »
      Watched that Detroit tonight, thought it was another powerful movie from Kathryn Bigelow.
      srslfc
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      Re: The Film Discussion Thread.
      Reply #5186 : Aug 31, 2017 07:00:30 am »
      Watched that Detroit tonight, thought it was another powerful movie from Kathryn Bigelow.

      Looking forward to this.
      Swab
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      Re: The Film Discussion Thread.
      Reply #5187 : Sep 05, 2017 04:02:35 pm »
      Bleed For This.

      Decent.
      HUYTON RED
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      Re: The Film Discussion Thread.
      Reply #5188 : Sep 05, 2017 04:13:32 pm »

      Enjoyed that, all about boxer Vinny Pazienza.
      Swab
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      Re: The Film Discussion Thread.
      Reply #5189 : Sep 05, 2017 06:01:57 pm »
      Enjoyed that, all about boxer Vinny Pazienza.

      I watched a lot of his fights back in the days before sky.
      There was a bloke who collected fight films, and he rented them out, which was the only way to watch some of the good fights.

      Never really rated Pazienza as a boxer, but there's no doubting his determination.

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