Trending Topics

      Next match: Everton v LFC [Premier League] Tue 16th Jun @ 8:00 pm
      Goodison Park

      Today is the 31st of May and on this date LFC's match record is P7 W5 D1 L1

      News Stories May 2018

      Read 687 times
      0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
      althebest1
      • Forum Legend - Fagan
      • *****
      • Started Topic

      • 4,075 posts | 387 
      News Stories May 2018
      May 02, 2018 12:33:54 pm
      So now May has done another U turn, trying to protect tax haven companies, who would have thought it get those Tories out!!

      https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/uk-tax-havens-dirty-money-corruption-theresa-may-bvi-cayman-islands-a8331311.html
      « Last Edit: May 03, 2018 06:20:06 am by althebest1 »
      Frankly, Mr Shankly
      • Guest
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #1: May 03, 2018 03:13:58 pm
      Robby The Z
      • LFC Reds Subscriber
      • ******
      • 5,497 posts | 1396 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #2: May 05, 2018 02:30:20 am
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8VsrlEqvwXo

      Crazy scenes in Hawaii these days. New earthquakes tonight.

      Nothing like a little molten lava flowing through the garden.
      Ribapuru
      • Banned
      • *****

      • 10,843 posts | 1370 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #3: May 05, 2018 10:42:52 am
      HUYTON RED
      • Forum Legend - Shankly
      • ******

      • 30,516 posts | 4346 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #4: May 09, 2018 04:25:26 pm
      We all getting these halfy-half scarves for the wedding?



      Arab Scouse
      • Forum Legend - Fagan
      • *****

      • 3,501 posts | 611 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #5: May 10, 2018 10:29:02 am
      Shabs
      • Forum Legend - Shankly
      • ******

      • 24,373 posts | 3273 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #6: May 10, 2018 10:47:51 am



      Israel/USA/Saudi going out their way to draw Iran into a war...Foolish.
      heimdall
      • LFC Reds Subscriber
      • ******
      • 10,859 posts | 2284 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #7: May 10, 2018 11:25:34 am


      Israel/USA/Saudi going out their way to draw Iran into a war...Foolish.

      and which way will Russia go, as I'm certain Syria will get dragged into any conflict.
      Ribapuru
      • Banned
      • *****

      • 10,843 posts | 1370 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #8: May 11, 2018 10:57:35 am
      So schools across the country lose lollipop men and grammar schools get massive amounts of Money. Lucky for Kent, who have bucket-loads of grammar schools. They'll get massive amounts of money in the hundreds of millions. What a load of crock. It has to be rich fat cat pensioners with a dozen properties for rent voting these scoundrels in. The old have already took enough from the younger generation, chance to buy a home, place in the EU, shoving us with this austerity driven leadership and now the right to a decent education.
      Arab Scouse
      • Forum Legend - Fagan
      • *****

      • 3,501 posts | 611 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #9: May 11, 2018 12:23:07 pm
      and which way will Russia go, as I'm certain Syria will get dragged into any conflict.

      Syria is already in a conflict.
      heimdall
      • LFC Reds Subscriber
      • ******
      • 10,859 posts | 2284 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #10: May 11, 2018 02:46:24 pm

      I was referring to any new conflict with Iran as you well know.
      heimdall
      • LFC Reds Subscriber
      • ******
      • 10,859 posts | 2284 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #11: May 11, 2018 02:49:01 pm
      So schools across the country lose lollipop men and grammar schools get massive amounts of Money. Lucky for Kent, who have bucket-loads of grammar schools. They'll get massive amounts of money in the hundreds of millions. What a load of crock. It has to be rich fat cat pensioners with a dozen properties for rent voting these scoundrels in. The old have already took enough from the younger generation, chance to buy a home, place in the EU, shoving us with this austerity driven leadership and now the right to a decent education.

      Are you kidding private landlords are getting completely fu**ed by the Tories as are most self employed people actually. A lot of the Tory policies at the moment are almost left of centre and they are hitting the middle classes hard, it sucks but what option is there?
      Ribapuru
      • Banned
      • *****

      • 10,843 posts | 1370 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #12: May 11, 2018 03:52:05 pm
      Are you kidding private landlords are getting completely fu**ed by the Tories as are most self employed people actually. A lot of the Tory policies at the moment are almost left of centre and they are hitting the middle classes hard, it sucks but what option is there?
      i don't agree on this one. People are still selling homes without a survey of the home. It's often first time buyers footing the bill, or risk buying a heap of sh*te. Landlords can just rent if they don't sell, Tories shot down the fit for habitation bill. They rejected the safety laws that would have prevented greenfell, because there are so many Tory landlords. They talked about stopping buy to let, so greedy landlords can't extort poorer people to own more houses.. what did they do? f**k all.

      The solution is simple, stop letting home owners get free stamp duty, make this free for first time buyers and increase it for buy to let mortgages. Make it 5% of property price,so buy to let mortgage needs to pay 10k  stamp duty on a 200k property. Watch how many greedy landlords stop buy to let.
      « Last Edit: May 11, 2018 04:04:34 pm by Ribapuru »
      HUYTON RED
      • Forum Legend - Shankly
      • ******

      • 30,516 posts | 4346 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #13: May 14, 2018 05:19:15 pm
      Gaza clashes: Dozens killed as US opens Jerusalem embassy

      At least 43 Palestinians have been killed and 2,200 wounded by Israeli troops, Palestinian officials say, on the deadliest day of violence since the 2014 Gaza war.

      The violence came as the US opened its embassy in Jerusalem, a move that has infuriated Palestinians.

      They see it as clear US backing for Israeli rule over the whole city, whose eastern part Palestinians lay claim to.

      But US President Donald Trump hailed the move in a video message.

      He told the dedication ceremony that it had been a "long time coming", adding: "Israel is a sovereign nation with the right to determine its own capital but for many years we failed to acknowledge the obvious."

      The US, he added, remained "committed to facilitating a lasting peace agreement".

      Palestinians hurled stones and incendiary devices while the Israeli military used snipers, as black smoke poured from burning tyres.

      The health ministry, run by Gaza's Islamist rulers Hamas, said children were among those killed on Monday.

      The Hamas-led demonstrations are part of a six-week protest dubbed the "Great March of Return".

      Israel says the protests are aimed at breaching the border and attacking Israeli communities nearby.

      The Israeli military said 40,000 Palestinians had taken part in "violent riots" at 13 locations along the Gaza Strip security fence.

      It said the Israeli military had killed three people trying to plant explosives near the security fence in Rafah. Aircraft and tanks had also targeted military positions belonging to Hamas in the northern Gaza Strip, it said.

      There have also been violent clashes between Israeli police and protesters who raised Palestinian flags outside the new embassy. Several protesters were detained.

      EU foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini has called for "utmost restraint"

      Palestinians have held weekly protests in the run-up to their annual commemoration of what they call the Nakba or Catastrophe, when hundreds of thousands of their people fled their homes or were displaced following the foundation of the Israeli state on 14 May 1948.

      Scores of Palestinians have been killed since the protests began. Thousands more have been wounded.

      Hamas, which is in a state of conflict with Israel, had said it would step up protests in the lead-up to Tuesday, the official Nakba commemoration.

      It says it wants to draw attention to what Palestinians insist is their right to return to ancestral homes in what became Israel.

      "Today is the big day when we will cross the fence and tell Israel and the world we will not accept being occupied forever," a science teacher in Gaza, Ali, told Reuters news agency.

      A small interim embassy will start operating from Monday inside the existing US consulate building in Jerusalem. A larger site will be found later when the rest of the embassy moves from Tel Aviv.

      The opening ceremony was brought forward to coincide with the state of Israel's 70th anniversary.

      Mr Trump's daughter, Ivanka, and her husband Jared Kushner, who are both senior White House advisers, joined US Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and Deputy Secretary of State John Sullivan for the ceremony.

      After Ivanka Trump had unveiled the seal of the embassy, Mr Kushner said in his address: "When President Trump makes a promise he keeps it... We have shown the world that the US can be trusted. We stand with our friends and allies."

      Mr Kushner also referred to Mr Trump's withdrawal from the "dangerous, flawed and one-sided Iran deal", drawing applause from the guests.

      Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said: "What a glorious day. Remember this moment. This is history. President Trump, by recognising history, you have made history. All of us are deeply grateful."

      A spokesman for Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas said on Monday: "With this step, the US administration has cancelled its role in the peace process and has insulted the world, the Palestinian people and the Arab and the Islamic nation and it has created incitement and instability."

      Arab League chief Ahmed Abul Gheit said it was "shameful to see countries participating with the US and Israel in celebrating the former's embassy move to occupied Jerusalem in a clear and grave violation of international law".

      The status of Jerusalem goes to the heart of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

      Israeli sovereignty over Jerusalem is not recognised internationally and, according to the 1993 Israel-Palestinian peace accords, the final status of Jerusalem is meant to be discussed in the latter stages of peace talks.

      Israel has occupied East Jerusalem since the 1967 Middle East war. It effectively annexed the sector, though this was not recognised by any countries until Mr Trump's declaration in December 2017.

      Since 1967, Israel has built a dozen settlements, home to about 200,000 Jews, in East Jerusalem. These are considered illegal under international law, although Israel disputes this.

      Various countries once had embassies based in Jerusalem but many moved after Israel passed a law in 1980 formally making Jerusalem its capital.

      http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-44104599
      FATKOPITE10
      • LFC Reds Subscriber
      • ******
      • 11,379 posts | 2163 
      • Liverpool fc give me tourettes
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #14: May 14, 2018 05:26:26 pm
      And to think some think that c**t trump deserves to nobel peace prize
      Shabs
      • Forum Legend - Shankly
      • ******

      • 24,373 posts | 3273 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #15: May 14, 2018 05:35:09 pm
      Israel,The only democracy in the Middle East my f**king arse it is..

      Trump had to call the embassy move because he's in debt to Sheldon Andelson,Andelson bankrolled the Trump presidency..

      Trump is compromised by agents of the Israeli state.

      Jared Kushner went cap in hand to Qatar and beg for $500 million to bail out his family business, Qatar said no, now are boycotted by the puppets Gulf Monarchies..

      I stand with the brave people of the open prison Gaza.
      Arab Scouse
      • Forum Legend - Fagan
      • *****

      • 3,501 posts | 611 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #16: May 15, 2018 09:34:52 am
      Israel,The only democracy in the Middle East my f**king arse it is..

      Trump had to call the embassy move because he's in debt to Sheldon Andelson,Andelson bankrolled the Trump presidency..

      Trump is compromised by agents of the Israeli state.

      Jared Kushner went cap in hand to Qatar and beg for $500 million to bail out his family business, Qatar said no, now are boycotted by the puppets Gulf Monarchies..

      I stand with the brave people of the open prison Gaza.

      Awful what's going on.

      Israel = Apartheid military state.
      HUYTON RED
      • Forum Legend - Shankly
      • ******

      • 30,516 posts | 4346 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #17: May 15, 2018 02:00:47 pm
      F***ing hell the comments from the Israeli spokeswoman are absolutely unbelievable.

      https://mobile.twitter.com/Doyle1876/status/996080970272034816
      Shabs
      • Forum Legend - Shankly
      • ******

      • 24,373 posts | 3273 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #18: May 15, 2018 02:17:57 pm
      F***ing hell the comments from the Israeli spokeswoman are absolutely unbelievable.

      https://mobile.twitter.com/Doyle1876/status/996080970272034816

      Expected nothing less from the Israelis.. You will find they always have a justified reason to kill innocent Palestinians..

      American Evangelist who support Trump and Israel should hang thier head in shame...
      Shabs
      • Forum Legend - Shankly
      • ******

      • 24,373 posts | 3273 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #19: May 15, 2018 02:18:55 pm
      heimdall
      • LFC Reds Subscriber
      • ******
      • 10,859 posts | 2284 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #20: May 15, 2018 02:44:00 pm
      i don't agree on this one. People are still selling homes without a survey of the home. It's often first time buyers footing the bill, or risk buying a heap of sh*te. Landlords can just rent if they don't sell, Tories shot down the fit for habitation bill. They rejected the safety laws that would have prevented greenfell, because there are so many Tory landlords. They talked about stopping buy to let, so greedy landlords can't extort poorer people to own more houses.. what did they do? f**k all.

      The solution is simple, stop letting home owners get free stamp duty, make this free for first time buyers and increase it for buy to let mortgages. Make it 5% of property price,so buy to let mortgage needs to pay 10k  stamp duty on a 200k property. Watch how many greedy landlords stop buy to let.

      Bloody hell you really don't follow the news do you.

      Stamp Duty is already higher for buy to let, introduced by the Tories.

      Mortgage interest tax relief is being phased out which means that from 2020 you can't deduct mortgage costs from your rental income, this means that for some private landlords they end up paying more tax than they collect in revenue, again introduced by the evil Tories.


      So tell me again how the Tories help private landlords?
      heimdall
      • LFC Reds Subscriber
      • ******
      • 10,859 posts | 2284 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #21: May 15, 2018 02:52:37 pm
      And to think some think that c**t trump deserves to nobel peace prize

      I think he does, not for this but for bringing North Korea to the negotiation table something the great Obama utterly failed to do.
      The Iran deal was a crap deal because it allowed Iran much needed funds to start restocking and rearming their conventional armed forces and to start agitating in the region again.

      This embassy move has been a US promise for a long time, its something Obama refused to commit to.
      heimdall
      • LFC Reds Subscriber
      • ******
      • 10,859 posts | 2284 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #22: May 15, 2018 02:54:45 pm
      Awful what's going on.

      Israel = Apartheid military state.

      As opposed to the rest of the middle east which is so tolerant and passionate regarding human rights.
      HScRed1
      • LFC Reds Subscriber
      • ******
      • 14,955 posts | 3130 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #23: May 15, 2018 02:59:15 pm
      As opposed to the rest of the middle east which is so tolerant and passionate regarding human rights.

      Have you taken over from Beerbelly as the resident right wing nut job?
      Shabs
      • Forum Legend - Shankly
      • ******

      • 24,373 posts | 3273 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #24: May 15, 2018 03:31:36 pm
      I think he does, not for this but for bringing North Korea to the negotiation table something the great Obama utterly failed to do.
      The Iran deal was a crap deal because it allowed Iran much needed funds to start restocking and rearming their conventional armed forces and to start agitating in the region again.

      This embassy move has been a US promise for a long time, its something Obama refused to commit to.

      Not just Obama but all Presidents...like I said, Trump is compromised! Israel has a stranglehold on the USA & majority of its representatives as with Britain.

      As opposed to the rest of the middle east which is so tolerant and passionate regarding human rights.

      The other ME countries don't f**king boast that they are beacon of democracy in that region, Israel does...Zionism needs eradicating from British politics..
      Arab Scouse
      • Forum Legend - Fagan
      • *****

      • 3,501 posts | 611 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #25: May 15, 2018 04:04:58 pm
      I think he does, not for this but for bringing North Korea to the negotiation table something the great Obama utterly failed to do.
      The Iran deal was a crap deal because it allowed Iran much needed funds to start restocking and rearming their conventional armed forces and to start agitating in the region again.

      This embassy move has been a US promise for a long time, its something Obama refused to commit to.

      What has other arab countries have to do with what happened yesterday?
      stuey
      • LFC Reds Subscriber
      • ******
      • 33,752 posts | 3303 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #26: May 15, 2018 07:47:04 pm
      Fracking mogul is UK's richest man
      A billionaire who tried to axe worker's tea breaks and froze pay for 3 years has been named the UK's richest man topping the rich list with a wealth of £21.05bn.
      Jim Ratcliffe 65 made his cash as boss of Ineos one of the UK's biggest fracking firms, his success follows a bitter fight with his workers at his Scottish petrochemical plant in 2016.
      Following a 3 year pay freeze Ratcliffe planned to axe a 10am tea break but following a pay dispute 800 workers had to accept a survival plan or face the prospect of losing their jobs.

      The Tory's manical haste to impose fracking on the nation is no doubt connected with Ratcliffe lobbying the former Chancellor George Osborne to attack unions, cut the firm's taxes and support fracking, measures on a wider scale that are without doubt instrumental in Ratcliffe's obscene wealth.   


      https://www.commonspace.scot/tags/jim-ratcliffe#
      althebest1
      • Forum Legend - Fagan
      • *****
      • Started Topic

      • 4,075 posts | 387 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #27: May 16, 2018 04:47:11 pm
      SM
      • Forum Legend - Fagan
      • *****

      • 3,557 posts | 393 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #28: May 17, 2018 06:48:32 am
      We all getting these halfy-half scarves for the wedding?





      Please tell me that this is made up?

      This can't be true it's shocking if it is!
      heimdall
      • LFC Reds Subscriber
      • ******
      • 10,859 posts | 2284 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #29: May 17, 2018 08:04:58 am
      Not just Obama but all Presidents...like I said, Trump is compromised! Israel has a stranglehold on the USA & majority of its representatives as with Britain.

      The other ME countries don't f**king boast that they are beacon of democracy in that region, Israel does...Zionism needs eradicating from British politics..

      I agree that Israel is far r from perfect but when as a ntion and a people you are constantly under attack then its somewhat understandable that you tend to overreact. The entire middle east region is a clusterfuck and I can't see any solution to it, I simply cannot see the Arabs and Persians ever accepting Israel nor the Jews ever abandoning Israel so its stalemate forever and war forever, very depressing.
      As for Western influence in Israel, or Zionism, it is again completely understandable. The Jews are a very clever bunch of people and tend to rise high into positions of great power in most Western countries, from these positions of power in media, banking and politics its very easy to shape foreign policy in their direction. By the way that is not meant as a slur of any kind but as a compliment. The other side to that is that its in the West's, certainly US and UK, interest to have a strong presence in the Middle east region and Israel is a very strong ally and friend to have.

      The summary is that there is no way the other middle east regions can do anything about Israel so they should realise this and try to reach as good a compromise as possible so they can all live in peace but sadly I doubt this will ever happen.
      HUYTON RED
      • Forum Legend - Shankly
      • ******

      • 30,516 posts | 4346 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #30: May 17, 2018 03:29:49 pm
      Please tell me that this is made up?

      This can't be true it's shocking if it is!

      Probably worn by these types in the pics :laugh:

      https://twitter.com/gavmacn/status/996810904963616768
      Shabs
      • Forum Legend - Shankly
      • ******

      • 24,373 posts | 3273 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #31: May 17, 2018 04:59:39 pm
      I agree that Israel is far r from perfect but when as a ntion and a people you are constantly under attack then its somewhat understandable that you tend to overreact. The entire middle east region is a clusterfuck and I can't see any solution to it, I simply cannot see the Arabs and Persians ever accepting Israel nor the Jews ever abandoning Israel so its stalemate forever and war forever, very depressing.
      As for Western influence in Israel, or Zionism, it is again completely understandable. The Jews are a very clever bunch of people and tend to rise high into positions of great power in most Western countries, from these positions of power in media, banking and politics its very easy to shape foreign policy in their direction. By the way that is not meant as a slur of any kind but as a compliment. The other side to that is that its in the West's, certainly US and UK, interest to have a strong presence in the Middle east region and Israel is a very strong ally and friend to have.

      The summary is that there is no way the other middle east regions can do anything about Israel so they should realise this and try to reach as good a compromise as possible so they can all live in peace but sadly I doubt this will ever happen.

      Israel is the occupier,it occupies Palestine,occupies the Golan Heights,attacks Syrian Armyies who are defeating ISIS, constantly violates Lebanaon & operates in the Sina,so they are the bullies of the region and only are so with the blessing of the USA..

      On recognising Israel, have you not read or heard the Gulf Monarchies coming out in support of Isarel and recocognising it as a State?..The Iranians (Persians) have the largest concentration of Jews outside of Israel, I've not seen or read how Jews in Iran feel threatened living in a Muslim country where they enjoy equal rights as citizens..Jews are not called on for abandoning their state, what they being called out for is to allow a Palestinian State side by side,without any Air,Land or Sea blockade, allow Palestine to thrive as a powerful economy which it will given the chance.

      Isarel needs to stop its violation of Christian & Muslim holy sites, It needs to allow free access to 'All' Palestinains access to the Al Aqsa Mosque, not just a certain number above the age of 45..

      As for you observations on Jews being clever & working their way to the top of organisations in the West could be seen as views that reinforces the old Anti Semitic propaganda that's spouted by Nazis & Facist..I agree though that the Jewish control over media,banking,entertainment,sport is disproportionate, our politicians also have seem to be bought by the Jewish money influence,ie; The Israeli embassy offered £1 million to undermine Jeremy Corbyn & anyone who speaks out against the policies & violations of the Israelis government...

      Labour & Conservative Friends of Isarel need investigating, Just like AIPAC in the States, they have leavearage over of politicians..

      Finally, this is where I'm at with the whole cluster f**k that region is..

      Israel has a choice to make, it either accepts Palestine as a Secular Insependent State next door or become a apartheid racist state (already is) exclusively to Jews only in which the Christian & Muslim Arab/African are treated as second class citizens with next to no rights...

      I hope we see a single secular state wether it be Israel or Palestine, free democratic elections in which any person of faith & non, Arab,Jew could lead the country... Won't happen..just as Yhitzak Rabin.
      HUYTON RED
      • Forum Legend - Shankly
      • ******

      • 30,516 posts | 4346 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #32: May 18, 2018 04:36:04 pm
      22nd School shooting in America this year!

      Santa Fe High School: 'Eight fatalities' reported in shooting

      Up to eight people have been reported dead in a shooting at a Texas high school, which is on lockdown.

      One person is in custody after the attack at Santa Fe High School, which is about 40 miles (65km) south of Houston, according to school officials.

      The school district has confirmed people were injured in an "active shooter" incident as classes began.

      It is unclear if the attacker was a student. Police have not yet confirmed any fatalities.

      The sheriff of Harris County, the largest county in Texas, tweeted that his officers were responding to a "multiple-casualty incident".

      Sheriff Ed Gonzalez tweeted that one person was in custody and "a second one detained".

      "An injured police officer is being treated, the extent of his injuries are unknown," he wrote.

      Several students described hearing a fire alarm go off shortly before 08:00 local time. It is not clear how the alarm was activated.

      One witness told KTRK-TV the shooting happened in her art class, and that one person shot was a girl.

      "There was someone that walked in with a shotgun and started shooting," the student said, "and this girl got shot in the leg."

      She said that she did not get a look at the shooter, because she ran to hide.

      One 10th grader told networks she had an asthma attack while hiding in the woods.

      News helicopters filmed students emptying their backpacks in front of armed officers in a field outside the school.

      A bomb squad is currently on scene, and several helicopter ambulances have flown victims to a nearby hospital.

      Federal officials with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) are helping the investigation.

      President Donald Trump tweeted: "School shooting in Texas. Early reports not looking good. God bless all!"

      First Lady Melania Trump tweeted from her hospital bed: "My heart goes out of Santa Fe and all of Texas today."

      http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-44173954
      HUYTON RED
      • Forum Legend - Shankly
      • ******

      • 30,516 posts | 4346 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #33: May 18, 2018 05:15:07 pm
      I imagine this would be like a scene from Police Academy!!

      https://twitter.com/SkyNewsBreak/status/997495884647673857
      HUYTON RED
      • Forum Legend - Shankly
      • ******

      • 30,516 posts | 4346 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #34: May 18, 2018 05:57:45 pm
      22nd School shooting in America this year!

      Santa Fe High School: 'Eight fatalities' reported in shooting

      Up to eight people have been reported dead in a shooting at a Texas high school, which is on lockdown.

      One person is in custody after the attack at Santa Fe High School, which is about 40 miles (65km) south of Houston, according to school officials.

      The school district has confirmed people were injured in an "active shooter" incident as classes began.

      It is unclear if the attacker was a student. Police have not yet confirmed any fatalities.

      The sheriff of Harris County, the largest county in Texas, tweeted that his officers were responding to a "multiple-casualty incident".

      Sheriff Ed Gonzalez tweeted that one person was in custody and "a second one detained".

      "An injured police officer is being treated, the extent of his injuries are unknown," he wrote.

      Several students described hearing a fire alarm go off shortly before 08:00 local time. It is not clear how the alarm was activated.

      One witness told KTRK-TV the shooting happened in her art class, and that one person shot was a girl.

      "There was someone that walked in with a shotgun and started shooting," the student said, "and this girl got shot in the leg."

      She said that she did not get a look at the shooter, because she ran to hide.

      One 10th grader told networks she had an asthma attack while hiding in the woods.

      News helicopters filmed students emptying their backpacks in front of armed officers in a field outside the school.

      A bomb squad is currently on scene, and several helicopter ambulances have flown victims to a nearby hospital.

      Federal officials with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) are helping the investigation.

      President Donald Trump tweeted: "School shooting in Texas. Early reports not looking good. God bless all!"

      First Lady Melania Trump tweeted from her hospital bed: "My heart goes out of Santa Fe and all of Texas today."

      http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-44173954


      https://twitter.com/SantaFeISD/status/997518167428739072
      FATKOPITE10
      • LFC Reds Subscriber
      • ******
      • 11,379 posts | 2163 
      • Liverpool fc give me tourettes
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #35: May 18, 2018 06:10:57 pm
      Donald trump patronising tweet coming in 3.2.1..
      Arab Scouse
      • Forum Legend - Fagan
      • *****

      • 3,501 posts | 611 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #36: May 18, 2018 06:16:30 pm
      I agree that Israel is far r from perfect but when as a ntion and a people you are constantly under attack then its somewhat understandable that you tend to overreact. The entire middle east region is a clusterfuck and I can't see any solution to it, I simply cannot see the Arabs and Persians ever accepting Israel nor the Jews ever abandoning Israel so its stalemate forever and war forever, very depressing.
      As for Western influence in Israel, or Zionism, it is again completely understandable. The Jews are a very clever bunch of people and tend to rise high into positions of great power in most Western countries, from these positions of power in media, banking and politics its very easy to shape foreign policy in their direction. By the way that is not meant as a slur of any kind but as a compliment. The other side to that is that its in the West's, certainly US and UK, interest to have a strong presence in the Middle east region and Israel is a very strong ally and friend to have.

      The summary is that there is no way the other middle east regions can do anything about Israel so they should realise this and try to reach as good a compromise as possible so they can all live in peace but sadly I doubt this will ever happen.

      Lol, netanyahu doesn't want peace, he wants to establish a Jewish state and that's by driving off Palestinians from their lands by building settlements that are against international law.

      Other ME nations can't do anything about it because they look after their own interest, which is understandable, especially gulf nations who have strong ties with the US. What's not understandable how Netanyahu and the state of Israel are getting away with murder and opinions worldwide are divided about it. There is clear apartheid, Palestinians driven off to become refugees and being blockaded by an aggressive military state that doesn't allow a race of people to have their basic rights.
      HUYTON RED
      • Forum Legend - Shankly
      • ******

      • 30,516 posts | 4346 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #37: May 18, 2018 06:30:46 pm
      CNN Breaking News: Cuban domestic flight has crashed at airport in Havana
      FATKOPITE10
      • LFC Reds Subscriber
      • ******
      • 11,379 posts | 2163 
      • Liverpool fc give me tourettes
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #38: May 18, 2018 07:24:00 pm
      My thoughts and prayers for the people of America for having a complete dickhead as a president
      Ribapuru
      • Banned
      • *****

      • 10,843 posts | 1370 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #39: May 18, 2018 07:53:49 pm
      Trump will come out, condemn it... say a bunch of other stuff and then get back into NRA's pocket.
      RedPuppy
      • WASH YOUR HANDS
      • LFC Reds Subscriber
      • ******
      • 17,900 posts | 2223 
      • Parum Rutilus Canis: Illegitimi non carborundum
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #40: May 18, 2018 08:01:49 pm
      Ribapuru
      • Banned
      • *****

      • 10,843 posts | 1370 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #41: May 18, 2018 08:09:08 pm
      I won't be going to America on holiday that is for sure. What Trump thinks he is gaining from NRA, is nothing compared to what will be lost due to the hit on Tourism. Gun ban is long overdue. This has got to be the final straw.
      HUYTON RED
      • Forum Legend - Shankly
      • ******

      • 30,516 posts | 4346 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #42: May 18, 2018 08:16:14 pm

      Where do you start with that f**king idiot? Crass, insensitive and f**king ghoulish!!
      RedPuppy
      • WASH YOUR HANDS
      • LFC Reds Subscriber
      • ******
      • 17,900 posts | 2223 
      • Parum Rutilus Canis: Illegitimi non carborundum
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #43: May 18, 2018 08:21:42 pm
      Where do you start with that f**king idiot? Crass, insensitive and f**king ghoulish!!

      I'd start with sending him to school, quite clearly the lack of any education is an issue with these people.

      Below is an astonishing insight into Texas gun laws.

      https://twitter.com/EVRYBODYvsTRUMP/status/997553189619675137
      waltonl4
      • LFC Reds Subscriber
      • ******
      • 28,389 posts | 4326 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #44: May 18, 2018 09:07:07 pm
      We all getting these halfy-half scarves for the wedding?





      I have gone for the full tattoo one on each cheek facing each other
      Frankly, Mr Shankly
      • Guest
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #45: May 18, 2018 09:15:43 pm
      SM
      • Forum Legend - Fagan
      • *****

      • 3,557 posts | 393 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #46: May 19, 2018 06:54:09 am
      Trump will come out, condemn it... say a bunch of other stuff and then get back into NRA's pocket.

      The same as every other President before him then?
      stuey
      • LFC Reds Subscriber
      • ******
      • 33,752 posts | 3303 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #47: May 19, 2018 09:05:02 am
      Where do you start with that f**king idiot? Crass, insensitive and f**king ghoulish!!

      A good number in the US applaud the actions of this f**king idiot.
      YANK_LFC_FAN
      • LFC Reds Subscriber
      • ******
      • 3,202 posts | 330 
      • Timid men prefer the calm of despotism!
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #48: May 19, 2018 02:01:04 pm
      I was watching the wedding... that had to be the first time EVER a black, Southern preacher gave a sermon in the Chapel at Windsor Castle. The best part was he absolutely crushed it. It was awesome and i am not religous at all. I was waiting for someone to stand and say "Hallelujah".
      Shabs
      • Forum Legend - Shankly
      • ******

      • 24,373 posts | 3273 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #49: May 19, 2018 03:02:32 pm
      Just saying I think the newlyweds absaloutley suit each other & I loved the ceremony..

      Love all that pomp & stuff..
      Frankly, Mr Shankly
      • Guest
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #50: May 19, 2018 03:54:24 pm
      I was watching the wedding... that had to be the first time EVER a black, Southern preacher gave a sermon in the Chapel at Windsor Castle. The best part was he absolutely crushed it. It was awesome and i am not religous at all. I was waiting for someone to stand and say "Hallelujah".

      Heard that Her Maj had gagged Phil for the whole of that sermon.
      Shabs
      • Forum Legend - Shankly
      • ******

      • 24,373 posts | 3273 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #51: May 19, 2018 03:57:48 pm
      Heard that Her Maj had gagged Phil for the whole of that sermon.

      Looked like death warmed up did Phil..
      HUYTON RED
      • Forum Legend - Shankly
      • ******

      • 30,516 posts | 4346 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #52: May 19, 2018 07:27:27 pm
      I was watching the wedding... that had to be the first time EVER a black, Southern preacher gave a sermon in the Chapel at Windsor Castle. The best part was he absolutely crushed it. It was awesome and i am not religous at all. I was waiting for someone to stand and say "Hallelujah".

      Missed that bit, although seen a snippet on the news.

      Hahaha would of been funny if the Queen had jumped up with "Motherfucker Amen"

      Heard that Her Maj had gagged Phil for the whole of that sermon.

      He was probably tripping his bollocks off all the way through that service on his meds!!
      FATKOPITE10
      • LFC Reds Subscriber
      • ******
      • 11,379 posts | 2163 
      • Liverpool fc give me tourettes
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #53: May 19, 2018 07:33:57 pm
      Missed that bit, although seen a snippet on the news.

      Hahaha would of been funny if the Queen had jumped up with "Motherfucker Amen"

      He was probably tripping his bollocks off all the way through that service on his meds!!


      The look on liz and phils faces is priceless,  William trying not to piss himself, nice of them to give them sussex as a wedding present too
      YANK_LFC_FAN
      • LFC Reds Subscriber
      • ******
      • 3,202 posts | 330 
      • Timid men prefer the calm of despotism!
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #54: May 20, 2018 03:00:23 am
      Every Woman in the world is talking about the dress and the tiara and rings and carriage and the flowers etc,etc.... all I saw was that gorgeous, BEAUTIFUL 60s Jaguar E Type. I would marry Harry for that Jag.

      Harry must of have been sleeping with every woman. He was a Prince of England, good looking, single and driving through London in a 60's Convertible Jaguar E Type.  He must REALLY love this girl to give that up!
      « Last Edit: May 20, 2018 05:22:54 am by YANK_LFC_FAN »
      Harrisimo
      • Forum Legend - Fagan
      • *****

      • 4,001 posts | 599 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #55: May 20, 2018 04:15:19 pm
      Just saying I think the newlyweds absaloutley suit each other & I loved the ceremony..

      Love all that pomp & stuff..

      Had a belly full of it..all over the papers etc. Now it will be the honeymoon..no end to it. Go by the adage...if it makes the people happy then who am I to complain..

      But still I get more fun out of moaning and whinging..
      heimdall
      • LFC Reds Subscriber
      • ******
      • 10,859 posts | 2284 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #56: May 20, 2018 05:25:49 pm
      Israel is the occupier,it occupies Palestine,occupies the Golan Heights,attacks Syrian Armyies who are defeating ISIS, constantly violates Lebanaon & operates in the Sina,so they are the bullies of the region and only are so with the blessing of the USA..

      On recognising Israel, have you not read or heard the Gulf Monarchies coming out in support of Isarel and recocognising it as a State?..The Iranians (Persians) have the largest concentration of Jews outside of Israel, I've not seen or read how Jews in Iran feel threatened living in a Muslim country where they enjoy equal rights as citizens..Jews are not called on for abandoning their state, what they being called out for is to allow a Palestinian State side by side,without any Air,Land or Sea blockade, allow Palestine to thrive as a powerful economy which it will given the chance.

      Isarel needs to stop its violation of Christian & Muslim holy sites, It needs to allow free access to 'All' Palestinains access to the Al Aqsa Mosque, not just a certain number above the age of 45..

      As for you observations on Jews being clever & working their way to the top of organisations in the West could be seen as views that reinforces the old Anti Semitic propaganda that's spouted by Nazis & Facist..I agree though that the Jewish control over media,banking,entertainment,sport is disproportionate, our politicians also have seem to be bought by the Jewish money influence,ie; The Israeli embassy offered £1 million to undermine Jeremy Corbyn & anyone who speaks out against the policies & violations of the Israelis government...

      Labour & Conservative Friends of Isarel need investigating, Just like AIPAC in the States, they have leavearage over of politicians..

      Finally, this is where I'm at with the whole cluster f**k that region is..

      Israel has a choice to make, it either accepts Palestine as a Secular Insependent State next door or become a apartheid racist state (already is) exclusively to Jews only in which the Christian & Muslim Arab/African are treated as second class citizens with next to no rights...

      I hope we see a single secular state wether it be Israel or Palestine, free democratic elections in which any person of faith & non, Arab,Jew could lead the country... Won't happen..just as Yhitzak Rabin.

      I agree that a 2 state solution would be good, but I simply cannot see both sides chilling the f**k out and acting liek adults  for long enough to make it happen.
      HUYTON RED
      • Forum Legend - Shankly
      • ******

      • 30,516 posts | 4346 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #57: May 21, 2018 10:47:33 pm
      Doesn't need words, the video speaks volumes.

      https://twitter.com/Rossmac212/status/998604661769867264

      Video taken during local marathon in Plymouth!!
      HUYTON RED
      • Forum Legend - Shankly
      • ******

      • 30,516 posts | 4346 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #58: May 21, 2018 11:22:55 pm
      The Kremlin hits out over Roman Abramovich's UK visa

      The Chelsea owner is yet to have his UK visa renewed following its expiry, a source close to the oligarch has confirmed.

      The Kremlin has said that Russian businesses "often encounter unfriendly and unscrupulous actions", after Roman Abramovich's UK visa expired.

      The billionaire Chelsea owner is yet to have his UK visa renewed following its expiry in April, a source close to the oligarch has confirmed to Sky News.


      An application for it to be renewed has been lodged but the process is taking longer than usual, the source added.

      He did not attend Saturday's FA Cup final to see Chelsea beat Manchester United.

      It comes amid heightened diplomatic tensions between Russia and the UK in the wake of the Salisbury spy poisoning, along with recent British military involvement in Syria.

      The British government would not be drawn on the circumstances surrounding Mr Abramovich's investor visa application, stressing: "We don't discuss individual cases."

      Downing Street said visa applications from Russia are handled "rigorously and properly".

      "Work is under way in terms of reviewing Tier 1 investor visas," the PM's official spokesman said.

      "In 2014-15 we took action to tighten up the Tier 1 investor route, including the introduction of new powers to refuse applications where there are reasonable grounds to believe funds have been obtained unlawfully.

      "As a result of these reforms applications reduced by 84%.

      "We are currently taking another look at how the route operates and are undertaking further checks on investors who came to the UK through this route before the reforms were introduced."

      Mr Abramovich is worth an estimated £9.3bn, according to the Sunday Times Rich List, and has overseen an era of lavish spending at Chelsea since taking charge of the London club in 2003.

      He has links to Vladimir Putin's government in Moscow and, earlier this year, was included for the first time on a US list of Russian officials and oligarchs close to the Kremlin that could serve as a basis for future sanctions.

      The UK government has toughened its rhetoric against the Kremlin since the nerve agent attack on Sergei and Yulia Skripal in Salisbury in March.

      A committee of MPs released a hard-hitting report on Monday, accusing Mr Putin and his allies of "hiding and laundering their corrupt assets in London".

      Responding to the report, Moscow accused Britain of unprecedented "anti-Russian mania", warning such an attitude could backfire and scare off foreign investors.

      Downing Street has rejected claims it is "turning a blind eye" to "dirty money" from Russia, stressing it is determined to drive "dirty money and the money launderers" out of Britain.

      https://news.sky.com/story/the-kremlin-hits-out-over-roman-abramovichs-uk-visa-11380730
      stuey
      • LFC Reds Subscriber
      • ******
      • 33,752 posts | 3303 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #59: May 22, 2018 12:05:49 pm
      The Kremlin hits out over Roman Abramovich's UK visa

      The Chelsea owner is yet to have his UK visa renewed following its expiry, a source close to the oligarch has confirmed.

      The Kremlin has said that Russian businesses "often encounter unfriendly and unscrupulous actions", after Roman Abramovich's UK visa expired.

      The billionaire Chelsea owner is yet to have his UK visa renewed following its expiry in April, a source close to the oligarch has confirmed to Sky News.


      An application for it to be renewed has been lodged but the process is taking longer than usual, the source added.

      He did not attend Saturday's FA Cup final to see Chelsea beat Manchester United.

      It comes amid heightened diplomatic tensions between Russia and the UK in the wake of the Salisbury spy poisoning, along with recent British military involvement in Syria.

      The British government would not be drawn on the circumstances surrounding Mr Abramovich's investor visa application, stressing: "We don't discuss individual cases."

      Downing Street said visa applications from Russia are handled "rigorously and properly".

      "Work is under way in terms of reviewing Tier 1 investor visas," the PM's official spokesman said.

      "In 2014-15 we took action to tighten up the Tier 1 investor route, including the introduction of new powers to refuse applications where there are reasonable grounds to believe funds have been obtained unlawfully.

      "As a result of these reforms applications reduced by 84%.

      "We are currently taking another look at how the route operates and are undertaking further checks on investors who came to the UK through this route before the reforms were introduced."

      Mr Abramovich is worth an estimated £9.3bn, according to the Sunday Times Rich List, and has overseen an era of lavish spending at Chelsea since taking charge of the London club in 2003.

      He has links to Vladimir Putin's government in Moscow and, earlier this year, was included for the first time on a US list of Russian officials and oligarchs close to the Kremlin that could serve as a basis for future sanctions.

      The UK government has toughened its rhetoric against the Kremlin since the nerve agent attack on Sergei and Yulia Skripal in Salisbury in March.

      A committee of MPs released a hard-hitting report on Monday, accusing Mr Putin and his allies of "hiding and laundering their corrupt assets in London".

      Responding to the report, Moscow accused Britain of unprecedented "anti-Russian mania", warning such an attitude could backfire and scare off foreign investors.

      Downing Street has rejected claims it is "turning a blind eye" to "dirty money" from Russia, stressing it is determined to drive "dirty money and the money launderers" out of Britain.[/

      https://news.sky.com/story/the-kremlin-hits-out-over-roman-abramovichs-uk-visa-11380730


      Every day on Homes Under The Hammer there are Russian buyers paying millions for properties in London, this government lies out of habit - taking the piss now.
      FATKOPITE10
      • LFC Reds Subscriber
      • ******
      • 11,379 posts | 2163 
      • Liverpool fc give me tourettes
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #60: May 22, 2018 12:15:38 pm
      Doesn't need words, the video speaks volumes.

      https://twitter.com/Rossmac212/status/998604661769867264

      Video taken during local marathon in Plymouth!!

      Yeah , down here she is pretty unpopular
      Shabs
      • Forum Legend - Shankly
      • ******

      • 24,373 posts | 3273 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #61: May 22, 2018 12:17:53 pm
      May questions Oligarchs wealth after years of investing in the UK, jee! Where did you think they got the Roubles from, you know the ones that were bankrolling the Conservatory party... ;)

      Pure smokescreen this...it's called racketeering, proper old school shakedown..
      HScRed1
      • LFC Reds Subscriber
      • ******
      • 14,955 posts | 3130 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #62: May 22, 2018 12:21:03 pm
      Abramovich is in the inner circle of Putin.
      Will be interesting to see how long before he gets his visa, will be a green light for the Kremlin to poison a few more on the streets of the UK.
      althebest1
      • Forum Legend - Fagan
      • *****
      • Started Topic

      • 4,075 posts | 387 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #63: May 22, 2018 01:07:39 pm
      Every Woman in the world is talking about the dress and the tiara and rings and carriage and the flowers etc,etc.... all I saw was that gorgeous, BEAUTIFUL 60s Jaguar E Type. I would marry Harry for that Jag.

      Harry must of have been sleeping with every woman. He was a Prince of England, good looking, single and driving through London in a 60's Convertible Jaguar E Type.  He must REALLY love this girl to give that up!

      Nah mate it's been converted to electric, where's the fun in that  ???
      heimdall
      • LFC Reds Subscriber
      • ******
      • 10,859 posts | 2284 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #64: May 22, 2018 01:54:54 pm
      Abramovich is in the inner circle of Putin.
      Will be interesting to see how long before he gets his visa, will be a green light for the Kremlin to poison a few more on the streets of the UK.

      No he isn't and this is what is very weird about all this, he and Putin are not friends at all.
      Frankly, Mr Shankly
      • Guest
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #65: May 22, 2018 02:09:30 pm
      No he isn't and this is what is very weird about all this, he and Putin are not friends at all.

      Read this yesterday. Doesn't seem like they're enemies - in fact they seem quite dependent on each other.

      https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/may/21/is-abramovich-paying-price-for-being-too-close-to-putin
      heimdall
      • LFC Reds Subscriber
      • ******
      • 10,859 posts | 2284 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #66: May 22, 2018 02:24:58 pm

      I'm really confused by this because I always heard that Abramovich stayed away from Russia as he was nervous of what Putin might do, partly because he challenged Putin in 2012. Seems they must have kissed and made up which makes Abramovich an automatic c**t in my book, if he wasn't one already.
      Frankly, Mr Shankly
      • Guest
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #67: May 22, 2018 02:30:27 pm
      I'm really confused by this because I always heard that Abramovich stayed away from Russia as he was nervous of what Putin might do, partly because he challenged Putin in 2012. Seems they must have kissed and made up which makes Abramovich an automatic c**t in my book, if he wasn't one already.

      I'm sure it wouldn't take much for them both to be on the wrong side of each other given the high stakes corruption involved.
      « Last Edit: May 22, 2018 02:49:39 pm by Frankly, Mr Shankly »
      HUYTON RED
      • Forum Legend - Shankly
      • ******

      • 30,516 posts | 4346 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #68: May 22, 2018 02:38:15 pm
      I'm really confused by this because I always heard that Abramovich stayed away from Russia as he was nervous of what Putin might do, partly because he challenged Putin in 2012. Seems they must have kissed and made up which makes Abramovich an automatic c**t in my book, if he wasn't one already.

      Abramovich helped Putin fund and bring the World Cup to Russia!!
      YANK_LFC_FAN
      • LFC Reds Subscriber
      • ******
      • 3,202 posts | 330 
      • Timid men prefer the calm of despotism!
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #69: May 24, 2018 05:19:35 pm
      Nah mate it's been converted to electric, where's the fun in that  ???

      WHAT?  That is...WHAT? Why? Who did that? WHAT? 
      I'm nauseous.  Why dont they just turn Big Ben into a digital clock! Lets turn the Eiffel Tower into a wind turbine.
      Whoever did that should be brought to the Tower of London and hanged for assault and murder.

      Oh, the humanity!
      HUYTON RED
      • Forum Legend - Shankly
      • ******

      • 30,516 posts | 4346 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #70: May 24, 2018 10:45:51 pm
      F***ing hell, say it ain't so Morgan!!

      https://twitter.com/CNN/status/999666912442376192

      Might as well burn half my dvd's.
      waltonl4
      • LFC Reds Subscriber
      • ******
      • 28,389 posts | 4326 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #71: May 24, 2018 10:59:38 pm
      "So Mr Abramovich just how did you earn your fortune" ..."well my mate Vlad sorted me out for being his mate". He cant prove how he acquired his wealth because shithouse like him who steal from ordinary Russians don't keep accounts that show the truth.
      FATKOPITE10
      • LFC Reds Subscriber
      • ******
      • 11,379 posts | 2163 
      • Liverpool fc give me tourettes
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #72: May 24, 2018 11:05:23 pm
      "So Mr Abramovich just how did you earn your fortune" ..."well my mate Vlad sorted me out for being his mate". He cant prove how he acquired his wealth because shithouse like him who steal from ordinary Russians don't keep accounts that show the truth.


      Should give the tories a donation and he will get his own terminal at heathrow
      heimdall
      • LFC Reds Subscriber
      • ******
      • 10,859 posts | 2284 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #73: May 25, 2018 10:13:59 am
      "So Mr Abramovich just how did you earn your fortune" ..."well my mate Vlad sorted me out for being his mate". He cant prove how he acquired his wealth because shithouse like him who steal from ordinary Russians don't keep accounts that show the truth.


      These Oligarchs really are a bunch of cu*ts, that is capitalism gone way to far, even from my perspective!

      I had a job few years ago where I worked for a hedge fund which had offices in Moscow above a very exclusive shopping centre where you'd not see anyone all day other than the occasional "lady" who would come in surrounded by about 10 bodyguards all carrying various shopping bags, meanwhile if you went about 5 miles outside of the city centre it was more or less slum conditions or at least very deprived.
      Russia must rank as one of the most corrupt countries/dictatorships in the world and its such a shame as there is so much potential there.
      Boston not la
      • Forum Legend - Fagan
      • *****

      • 3,360 posts | 717 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #74: May 26, 2018 01:43:43 pm
      Well done Irish lads and lasses,i  don't have much faith in democratic process,so good news.http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-44265492.
      Boston not la
      • Forum Legend - Fagan
      • *****

      • 3,360 posts | 717 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #75: May 26, 2018 01:47:23 pm
      waltonl4
      • LFC Reds Subscriber
      • ******
      • 28,389 posts | 4326 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #76: May 28, 2018 06:10:20 pm
      Just witnessed a young Somalian man make the most incredible of rescues of a young boy hanging of a balcony 4th floor.
      He quickly and I do mean quickly climbed up the building and took hold of the boy and hauled him to safety it was incredible and the most unselfish act I have seen for a very long time.
      FATKOPITE10
      • LFC Reds Subscriber
      • ******
      • 11,379 posts | 2163 
      • Liverpool fc give me tourettes
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #77: May 28, 2018 06:15:22 pm
      Just witnessed a young Somalian man make the most incredible of rescues of a young boy hanging of a balcony 4th floor.
      He quickly and I do mean quickly climbed up the building and took hold of the boy and hauled him to safety it was incredible and the most unselfish act I have seen for a very long time.

      Probably deport the poor bloke now
      HUYTON RED
      • Forum Legend - Shankly
      • ******

      • 30,516 posts | 4346 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #78: May 28, 2018 06:27:35 pm
      Just witnessed a young Somalian man make the most incredible of rescues of a young boy hanging of a balcony 4th floor.
      He quickly and I do mean quickly climbed up the building and took hold of the boy and hauled him to safety it was incredible and the most unselfish act I have seen for a very long time.

      Seen that on Twitter, in France, amazing heroic act.
      waltonl4
      • LFC Reds Subscriber
      • ******
      • 28,389 posts | 4326 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #79: May 28, 2018 08:55:20 pm
      Probably deport the poor bloke now

      nope they have given him a job with the fire service and offered him citizenship.
      Shabs
      • Forum Legend - Shankly
      • ******

      • 24,373 posts | 3273 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #80: May 28, 2018 09:09:31 pm
      Things you have to do to qualify for a visa these days ;D

      FairPlay to the lad ...
      FATKOPITE10
      • LFC Reds Subscriber
      • ******
      • 11,379 posts | 2163 
      • Liverpool fc give me tourettes
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #81: May 28, 2018 09:39:36 pm
      nope they have given him a job with the fire service and offered him citizenship.

      Great news
      Frankly, Mr Shankly
      • Guest
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #82: May 28, 2018 11:25:51 pm
      nope they have given him a job with the fire service and offered him citizenship.

      When this Brexit thing goes tits up I know exactly what I'll do. I've already got the Eurostar booked!
      HUYTON RED
      • Forum Legend - Shankly
      • ******

      • 30,516 posts | 4346 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #83: May 29, 2018 02:53:02 pm
      Excellent piece from the NY Times regarding austerity in Britain, a lot of it centred around Liverpool & Merseyside.

      In Britain, Austerity Is Changing Everything

      After eight years of budget cutting, Britain is looking less like the rest of Europe and more like the United States, with a shrinking welfare state and spreading poverty.

      PRESCOT, England — A walk through this modest town in the northwest of England amounts to a tour of the casualties of Britain’s age of austerity.

      The old library building has been sold and refashioned into a glass-fronted luxury home. The leisure center has been razed, eliminating the public swimming pool. The local museum has receded into town history. The police station has been shuttered.

      Now, as the local government desperately seeks to turn assets into cash, Browns Field, a lush park in the center of town, may be doomed, too. At a meeting in November, the council included it on a list of 17 parks to sell to developers.

      “Everybody uses this park,” says Jackie Lewis, who raised two children in a red brick house a block away. “This is probably our last piece of community space. It’s been one after the other. You just end up despondent.”

      In the eight years since London began sharply curtailing support for local governments, the borough of Knowsley, a bedroom community of Liverpool, has seen its budget cut roughly in half. Liverpool itself has suffered a nearly two-thirds cut in funding from the national government — its largest source of discretionary revenue. Communities in much of Britain have seen similar losses.

      For a nation with a storied history of public largess, the protracted campaign of budget cutting, started in 2010 by a government led by the Conservative Party, has delivered a monumental shift in British life. A wave of austerity has yielded a country that has grown accustomed to living with less, even as many measures of social well-being — crime rates, opioid addiction, infant mortality, childhood poverty and homelessness — point to a deteriorating quality of life.

      When Ms. Lewis and her husband bought their home a quarter-century ago, Prescot had a comforting village feel. Now, core government relief programs are being cut and public facilities eliminated, adding pressure to public services like police and fire departments, just as they, too, grapple with diminished funding.

      By 2020, reductions already set in motion will produce cuts to British social welfare programs exceeding $36 billion a year compared with a decade earlier, or more than $900 annually for every working-age person in the country, according to a report from the Center for Regional Economic and Social Research at Sheffield Hallam University. In Liverpool, the losses will reach $1,200 a year per working-age person, the study says.

      “The government has created destitution,” says Barry Kushner, a Labour Party councilman in Liverpool and the cabinet member for children’s services. “Austerity has had nothing to do with economics. It was about getting out from under welfare. It’s about politics abandoning vulnerable people.”

      Conservative Party leaders say that austerity has been driven by nothing more grandiose than arithmetic.

      “It’s the ideology of two plus two equals four,” says Daniel Finkelstein, a Conservative member of the upper chamber of Parliament, the House of Lords, and a columnist for The Times of London. “It wasn’t driven by a desire to reduce spending on public services. It was driven by the fact that we had a vast deficit problem, and the debt was going to keep growing.”

      Whatever the operative thinking, austerity’s manifestations are palpable and omnipresent. It has refashioned British society, making it less like the rest of Western Europe, with its generous social safety nets and egalitarian ethos, and more like the United States, where millions lack health care and job loss can set off a precipitous plunge in fortunes.

      Much as the United States took the Great Depression of the 1930s as impetus to construct a national pension system while eventually delivering health care for the elderly and the poor, Britain reacted to the trauma of World War II by forging its own welfare state. The United States has steadily reduced benefits since the Reagan Revolution of the 1980s. Britain rolled back its programs in the same era, under the leadership of Margaret Thatcher. Still, its safety net remained robust by world standards.

      Then came the global financial panic of 2008 — the most crippling economic downturn since the Great Depression. Britain’s turn from its welfare state in the face of yawning budget deficits is a conspicuous indicator that the world has been refashioned by the crisis.

      As the global economy now negotiates a wrenching transition — with itinerant jobs replacing full-time positions and robots substituting for human labor — Britain’s experience provokes doubts about the durability of the traditional welfare model. As Western-style capitalism confronts profound questions about economic justice, vulnerable people appear to be growing more so.

      Conservative Party leaders initially sold budget cuts as a virtue, ushering in what they called the Big Society. Diminish the role of a bloated government bureaucracy, they contended, and grass-roots organizations, charities and private companies would step to the fore, reviving communities and delivering public services more efficiently.

      To a degree, a spirit of voluntarism materialized. At public libraries, volunteers now outnumber paid staff. In struggling communities, residents have formed food banks while distributing hand-me-down school uniforms. But to many in Britain, this is akin to setting your house on fire and then reveling in the community spirit as neighbors come running to help extinguish the blaze.

      Most view the Big Society as another piece of political sloganeering — long since ditched by the Conservatives — that served as justification for an austerity program that has advanced the refashioning unleashed in the 1980s by Mrs. Thatcher.

      “We are making cuts that I think Margaret Thatcher, back in the 1980s, could only have dreamt of,” Greg Barker said in a speech in 2011, when he was a Conservative member of Parliament.

      A backlash ensued, with public recognition that budget cuts came with tax relief for corporations, and that the extensive ranks of the wealthy were little disturbed.

      Britain hasn’t endured austerity to the same degree as Greece, where cutbacks were swift and draconian. Instead, British austerity has been a slow bleed, though the cumulative toll has been substantial.

      Local governments have suffered a roughly one-fifth plunge in revenue since 2010, after adding taxes they collect, according to the Institute for Fiscal Studies in London.

      Nationally, spending on police forces has dropped 17 percent since 2010, while the number of police officers has dropped 14 percent, according to an analysis by the Institute for Government. Spending on road maintenance has shrunk more than one-fourth, while support for libraries has fallen nearly a third.

      The national court system has eliminated nearly a third of its staff. Spending on prisons has plunged more than a fifth, with violent assaults on prison guards more than doubling. The number of elderly people receiving government-furnished care that enables them to remain in their homes has fallen by roughly a quarter.

      In an alternate reality, this nasty stretch of history might now be ending. Austerity measures were imposed in the name of eliminating budget deficits, and last year Britain finally produced a modest budget surplus.

      But the reality at hand is dominated by worries that Britain’s pending departure from the European Union — Brexit, as it is known — will depress growth for years to come. Though every major economy on earth has been expanding lately, Britain’s barely grew during the first three months of 2018. The unemployment rate sits just above 4 percent — its lowest level since 1975 — yet most wages remain lower than a decade ago, after accounting for rising prices.

      In the blue-collar reaches of northern England, in places like Liverpool, modern history tends to be told in the cadence of lamentation, as the story of one indignity after another. In these communities, Mrs. Thatcher’s name is an epithet, and austerity is the latest villain: London bankers concocted a financial crisis, multiplying their wealth through reckless gambling; then London politicians used budget deficits as an excuse to cut spending on the poor while handing tax cuts to corporations. Robin Hood, reversed.

      “It’s clearly an attack on our class,” says Dave Kelly, a retired bricklayer in the town of Kirkby, on the outskirts of Liverpool, where many factories sit empty, broken monuments to another age. “It’s an attack on who we are. The whole fabric of society is breaking down.”

      As much as any city, Liverpool has seen sweeping changes in its economic fortunes.

      In the 17th century, the city enriched itself on human misery. Local shipping companies sent vessels to West Africa, transporting slaves to the American colonies and returning bearing the fruits of bondage — cotton and tobacco, principally.

      The cotton fed the mills of Manchester nearby, yielding textiles destined for multiple continents. By the late 19th century, Liverpool’s port had become the gateway to the British Empire, its status underscored by the shipping company headquarters lining the River Mersey.

      By the next century — through the Great Depression and the German bombardment of World War II — Liverpool had descended into seemingly terminal decline. Its hard luck, blue-collar station was central to the identity of its most famous export, the Beatles, whose star power seemed enhanced by the fact such talent could emerge from such a place.

      Today, more than a quarter of Liverpool’s roughly 460,000 residents are officially poor, making austerity traumatic: Public institutions charged with aiding vulnerable people are themselves straining from cutbacks.

      Over the past eight years, the Merseyside Fire and Rescue Service, which serves greater Liverpool, has closed five fire stations while cutting the force to 620 firefighters from about 1,000.

      “I’ve had to preside over the systematic dismantling of the system,” says the fire chief, Dan Stephens.

      His department recently analyzed the 83 deaths that occurred in accidental house fires from 2007 to 2017. The majority of the victims — 51 people — lived alone and were alone at the time of the deadly fire. Nineteen of those 51 were in need of some form of home care.

      The loss of home care — a casualty of austerity — has meant that more older people are being left alone unattended.

      Virtually every public agency now struggles to do more with less while attending to additional problems once handled by some other outfit whose budget is also in tatters.

      Chief Stephens said people losing cash benefits are falling behind on their electric bills and losing service, resorting to candles for light — a major fire risk.

      The city has cut mental health services, so fewer staff members are visiting people prone to hoarding newspapers, for instance, leaving veritable bonfires piling up behind doors, unseen.

      “There are knock-on effects all the way through the system,” says Chief Stephens, who recently announced plans to resign and move to Australia.

      The National Health Service has supposedly been spared from budget cuts. But spending has been frozen in many areas, resulting in cuts per patient. At public hospitals, people have grown resigned to waiting for hours for emergency care, and weeks for referrals to specialists.

      “I think the government wants to run it down so the whole thing crumbles and they don’t have to worry about it anymore,” says Kenneth Buckle, a retired postal worker who has been waiting three months for a referral for a double knee replacement. “Everything takes forever now.”

      At Fulwood Green Medical Center in Liverpool, Dr. Simon Bowers, a general practitioner, points to austerity as an aggravating factor in the flow of stress-related maladies he encounters — high blood pressure, heart problems, sleeplessness, anxiety.

      He argues that the cuts, and the deterioration of the National Health Service, represent a renouncement of Britain’s historical debts. He rattles off the lowlights — the slave trave, colonial barbarity.

      “We as a country said, ‘We have been cruel. Let’s be nice now and look after everyone,’” Dr. Bowers says. “The N.H.S. has everyone’s back. It doesn’t matter how rich or poor you are. It’s written into the psyche of this country.”

      “Austerity isn’t a necessity,” he continued. “It’s a political choice, to move Britain in a different way. I can’t see a rationale beyond further enriching the rich while making the lives of the poor more miserable.”

      Wealthy Britons remain among the world’s most comfortable people, enjoying lavish homes, private medical care, top-notch schools and restaurants run by chefs from Paris and Tokyo. The poor, the elderly, the disabled and the jobless are increasingly prone to Kafka-esque tangles with the bureaucracy to keep public support.

      For Emma Wilde, a 31-year-old single mother, the misadventure began with an inscrutable piece of correspondence.

      Raised in the Liverpool neighborhood of Croxteth, Ms. Wilde has depended on welfare benefits to support herself and her two children. Her father, a retired window washer, is disabled. She has been taking care of him full time, relying on a so-called caregiver’s allowance, which amounts to about $85 a week, and income support reaching about $145 a month.

      The letter put this money in jeopardy.

      Sent by a private firm contracted to manage part of the government’s welfare programs, it informed Ms. Wilde that she was being investigated for fraud, accused of living with a partner — a development she is obliged to have reported.

      Ms. Wilde lives only with her children, she insists. But while the investigation proceeds, her benefits are suspended.

      Eight weeks after the money ceased, Ms. Wilde’s electricity was shut off for nonpayment. During the late winter, she and her children went to bed before 7 p.m. to save on heat. She has swallowed her pride and visited a food bank at a local church, bringing home bread and hamburger patties.

      “I felt a bit ashamed, like I had done something wrong, ” Ms. Wilde says. “But then you’ve got to feed the kids.”

      She has been corresponding with the Department for Work and Pensions, mailing bank statements to try to prove her limited income and to restore her funds.

      The experience has given her a perverse sense of community. At the local center where she brings her children for free meals, she has met people who lost their unemployment benefits after their bus was late and they missed an appointment with a caseworker. She and her friends exchange tips on where to secure hand-me-down clothes.

      “Everyone is in the same situation now,” Ms. Wilde says. “You just don’t have enough to live on.”

      From its inception, austerity carried a whiff of moral righteousness, as if those who delivered it were sober-minded grown-ups. Belt tightening was sold as a shared undertaking, an unpleasant yet unavoidable reckoning with dangerous budget deficits.

      “The truth is that the country was living beyond its means,” the then-chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne, declared in outlining his budget to Parliament in 2010. “Today, we have paid the debts of a failed past, and laid the foundations for a more prosperous future.”

      “Prosperity for all,” he added.

      Eight years later, housing subsidies have been restricted, along with tax credits for poor families. The government has frozen unemployment and disability benefits even as costs of food and other necessities have climbed. Over the last five years, the government has begun transitioning to so-called Universal Credit, giving those who receive benefits lump sum payments in place of funds from individual programs. Many have lost support for weeks or months while their cases have shifted to the new system.

      All of which is unfortunate yet inescapable, assert Conservative lawmakers. The government was borrowing roughly one-fourth of what it was spending. To put off cuts was to risk turning Britain into the next Greece.

      “The hard left has never been very clear about what their alternative to the program was,” says Neil O’Brien, a Conservative lawmaker who was previously a Treasury adviser to Mr. Osborne. “Presumably, it would be some enormous increase in taxation, but they are a bit shy about what that would mean.”

      He rejects the notion that austerity is a means of class warfare, noting that wealthy people have been hit with higher taxes on investment and expanded fees when buying luxury properties.

      Britain spends roughly the same portion of its national income on public spending today as it did a decade ago, said Paul Johnson, director of the Institute for Fiscal Studies.

      But those dependent on state support express a sense that the system has been rigged to discard them.

      Glendys Perry, 61, was born with cerebral palsy, making it difficult for her to walk. For three decades, she answered the phones at an auto parts company. After she lost that job in 2010, she lived on a disability check.

      Last summer, a letter came, summoning her to “an assessment.” The first question dispatched any notion that this was a sincere exploration.

      “How long have you had cerebral palsy?” (From birth.) “Will it get better?” (No.)

      In fact, her bones were weakening, and she fell often. Her hands were not quick enough to catch her body, resulting in bruises to her face.

      The man handling the assessment seemed uninterested.

      “Can you walk from here to there?” he asked her.

      He dropped a pen on the floor and commanded her to pick it up — a test of her dexterity.

      “How did you come here?” he asked her.

      “By bus,” she replied.

      Can you make a cup of tea? Can you get dressed?

      “I thought, ‘I’m physically disabled,’” she says. “‘Not mentally.’”

      When the letter came informing her that she was no longer entitled to her disability payment — that she had been deemed fit for work — she was not surprised.

      “They want you to be off of benefits,” she says. “I think they were just ticking boxes.”

      The political architecture of Britain insulates those imposing austerity from the wrath of those on the receiving end. London makes the aggregate cuts, while leaving to local politicians the messy work of allocating the pain.

      Spend a morning with the aggrieved residents of Prescot and one hears scant mention of London, or even austerity. People train their fury on the Knowsley Council, and especially on the man who was until recently its leader, Andy Moorhead. They accuse him of hastily concocting plans to sell Browns Field without community consultation.

      Mr. Moorhead, 62, seems an unlikely figure for the role of austerity villain. A career member of the Labour Party, he has the everyday bearing of a genial denizen of the corner pub.

      “I didn’t become a politician to take things off of people,” he says. “But you’ve got the reality to deal with.”

      The reality is that London is phasing out grants to local governments, forcing councils to live on housing and business taxes.

      “Austerity is here to stay,” says Jonathan Davies, director of the Center for Urban Research on Austerity at De Montfort University in Leicester, England. “What we might now see over the next two years is a wave of bankruptcies, like Detroit.”

      Indeed, the council of Northamptonshire, in the center of England, recently became the first local government in nearly two decades to meet that fate.

      Knowsley expects to spend $192 million in the next budget year, Mr. Moorhead says, with 60 percent of that absorbed by care for the elderly and services for children with health and developmental needs. An additional 18 percent will be spent on services the council must provide by law, such as garbage collection and highway maintenance.

      To Mr. Moorhead, the equation ends with the imperative to sell valuable land, yielding an endowment to protect remaining parks and services.

      “We’ve got to pursue development,” Mr. Moorhead says. “Locally, I’m the bad guy.”

      The real malefactors are the same as ever, he says.

      He points at a picture of Mrs. Thatcher on the wall behind him. He vents about London bankers, who left his people to clean up their mess.

      “No one should be doing this,” he says. “Not in the fifth-wealthiest country in the whole world. Sacking people, making people redundant, reducing our services for the vulnerable in our society. It’s the worst job in the world.”

      Now, it is someone else’s job. In early May, the local Labour Party ousted Mr. Moorhead as council leader amid mounting anger over the planned sale of parks.

      https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/28/world/europe/uk-austerity-poverty.html
      heimdall
      • LFC Reds Subscriber
      • ******
      • 10,859 posts | 2284 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #84: May 29, 2018 04:25:44 pm
      Just witnessed a young Somalian man make the most incredible of rescues of a young boy hanging of a balcony 4th floor.
      He quickly and I do mean quickly climbed up the building and took hold of the boy and hauled him to safety it was incredible and the most unselfish act I have seen for a very long time.

      Just slightly suspicious what the neighbour was doing and why he couldn't drag the boy to safety, also a bit suspicious how a 4 year old is able to cling to the outside of a building for about a minute.
      Other than that an act of great bravery!
      Shabs
      • Forum Legend - Shankly
      • ******

      • 24,373 posts | 3273 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #85: May 30, 2018 05:10:14 pm
      HUYTON RED
      • Forum Legend - Shankly
      • ******

      • 30,516 posts | 4346 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #86: May 31, 2018 11:13:30 pm
      You just have to love the cheek of any preacher that could blag enough people to fund and pay for a private jet for him!!

      US preacher asks followers to help buy fourth private jet

      A US televangelist has asked his followers to help fund his fourth private jet - because Jesus "wouldn't be riding a donkey".

      Jesse Duplantis said God had told him to buy a Falcoln 7X for $54m (£41m).

      He added he was hesitant about the purchase at first, but said God had told him: "I didn't ask you to pay for it. I asked you to believe for it."

      Although preachers owning private jets is not unusual, this particular appeal has caused controversy.

      Twitter users responded to the request with disbelief, with many quoting Bible verses warning against greed and "false prophets", or suggesting that the money could be better used to help the poor.

      In a video address posted on his website, 68-year-old Mr Duplantis explained: "You know, I've owned three different jets in my life, and I've used them and just burning them up for the Lord Jesus Christ.

      "Now, some people believe that preachers shouldn't have jets. I really believe that preachers ought to go on every available voice, every available outlet, to get this Gospel preached to the world."

      Standing beside framed pictures of his current fleet, he said that the jet he bought 12 years ago was no longer sufficient for his ministry because he could not fly non-stop, meaning he had to pay "exorbitant" refuelling costs.

      Another picture which appeared in the video showed the preacher standing with the three aircraft, above the caption: "It's not about possessions, it's about priorities."

      Mr Duplantis justified the request by saying that Jesus had told people to "go into the world and preach the Gospel to every creature, now how we gonna do that? I can't live long enough to travel by car or by ship or by train, but I can do it by an aeroplane".

      In 2015, Mr Duplantis appeared in a video with another preacher, Kenneth Copeland, in which Mr Copeland described travelling on commercial airlines as being "in a long tube with a bunch of demons".

      https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/amp/world-us-canada-44305873

      althebest1
      • Forum Legend - Fagan
      • *****
      • Started Topic

      • 4,075 posts | 387 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #87: Jun 01, 2018 01:13:53 pm
      Excellent piece from the NY Times regarding austerity in Britain, a lot of it centred around Liverpool & Merseyside.

      In Britain, Austerity Is Changing Everything

      After eight years of budget cutting, Britain is looking less like the rest of Europe and more like the United States, with a shrinking welfare state and spreading poverty.

      PRESCOT, England — A walk through this modest town in the northwest of England amounts to a tour of the casualties of Britain’s age of austerity.

      The old library building has been sold and refashioned into a glass-fronted luxury home. The leisure center has been razed, eliminating the public swimming pool. The local museum has receded into town history. The police station has been shuttered.

      Now, as the local government desperately seeks to turn assets into cash, Browns Field, a lush park in the center of town, may be doomed, too. At a meeting in November, the council included it on a list of 17 parks to sell to developers.

      “Everybody uses this park,” says Jackie Lewis, who raised two children in a red brick house a block away. “This is probably our last piece of community space. It’s been one after the other. You just end up despondent.”

      In the eight years since London began sharply curtailing support for local governments, the borough of Knowsley, a bedroom community of Liverpool, has seen its budget cut roughly in half. Liverpool itself has suffered a nearly two-thirds cut in funding from the national government — its largest source of discretionary revenue. Communities in much of Britain have seen similar losses.

      For a nation with a storied history of public largess, the protracted campaign of budget cutting, started in 2010 by a government led by the Conservative Party, has delivered a monumental shift in British life. A wave of austerity has yielded a country that has grown accustomed to living with less, even as many measures of social well-being — crime rates, opioid addiction, infant mortality, childhood poverty and homelessness — point to a deteriorating quality of life.

      When Ms. Lewis and her husband bought their home a quarter-century ago, Prescot had a comforting village feel. Now, core government relief programs are being cut and public facilities eliminated, adding pressure to public services like police and fire departments, just as they, too, grapple with diminished funding.

      By 2020, reductions already set in motion will produce cuts to British social welfare programs exceeding $36 billion a year compared with a decade earlier, or more than $900 annually for every working-age person in the country, according to a report from the Center for Regional Economic and Social Research at Sheffield Hallam University. In Liverpool, the losses will reach $1,200 a year per working-age person, the study says.

      “The government has created destitution,” says Barry Kushner, a Labour Party councilman in Liverpool and the cabinet member for children’s services. “Austerity has had nothing to do with economics. It was about getting out from under welfare. It’s about politics abandoning vulnerable people.”

      Conservative Party leaders say that austerity has been driven by nothing more grandiose than arithmetic.

      “It’s the ideology of two plus two equals four,” says Daniel Finkelstein, a Conservative member of the upper chamber of Parliament, the House of Lords, and a columnist for The Times of London. “It wasn’t driven by a desire to reduce spending on public services. It was driven by the fact that we had a vast deficit problem, and the debt was going to keep growing.”

      Whatever the operative thinking, austerity’s manifestations are palpable and omnipresent. It has refashioned British society, making it less like the rest of Western Europe, with its generous social safety nets and egalitarian ethos, and more like the United States, where millions lack health care and job loss can set off a precipitous plunge in fortunes.

      Much as the United States took the Great Depression of the 1930s as impetus to construct a national pension system while eventually delivering health care for the elderly and the poor, Britain reacted to the trauma of World War II by forging its own welfare state. The United States has steadily reduced benefits since the Reagan Revolution of the 1980s. Britain rolled back its programs in the same era, under the leadership of Margaret Thatcher. Still, its safety net remained robust by world standards.

      Then came the global financial panic of 2008 — the most crippling economic downturn since the Great Depression. Britain’s turn from its welfare state in the face of yawning budget deficits is a conspicuous indicator that the world has been refashioned by the crisis.

      As the global economy now negotiates a wrenching transition — with itinerant jobs replacing full-time positions and robots substituting for human labor — Britain’s experience provokes doubts about the durability of the traditional welfare model. As Western-style capitalism confronts profound questions about economic justice, vulnerable people appear to be growing more so.

      Conservative Party leaders initially sold budget cuts as a virtue, ushering in what they called the Big Society. Diminish the role of a bloated government bureaucracy, they contended, and grass-roots organizations, charities and private companies would step to the fore, reviving communities and delivering public services more efficiently.

      To a degree, a spirit of voluntarism materialized. At public libraries, volunteers now outnumber paid staff. In struggling communities, residents have formed food banks while distributing hand-me-down school uniforms. But to many in Britain, this is akin to setting your house on fire and then reveling in the community spirit as neighbors come running to help extinguish the blaze.

      Most view the Big Society as another piece of political sloganeering — long since ditched by the Conservatives — that served as justification for an austerity program that has advanced the refashioning unleashed in the 1980s by Mrs. Thatcher.

      “We are making cuts that I think Margaret Thatcher, back in the 1980s, could only have dreamt of,” Greg Barker said in a speech in 2011, when he was a Conservative member of Parliament.

      A backlash ensued, with public recognition that budget cuts came with tax relief for corporations, and that the extensive ranks of the wealthy were little disturbed.

      Britain hasn’t endured austerity to the same degree as Greece, where cutbacks were swift and draconian. Instead, British austerity has been a slow bleed, though the cumulative toll has been substantial.

      Local governments have suffered a roughly one-fifth plunge in revenue since 2010, after adding taxes they collect, according to the Institute for Fiscal Studies in London.

      Nationally, spending on police forces has dropped 17 percent since 2010, while the number of police officers has dropped 14 percent, according to an analysis by the Institute for Government. Spending on road maintenance has shrunk more than one-fourth, while support for libraries has fallen nearly a third.

      The national court system has eliminated nearly a third of its staff. Spending on prisons has plunged more than a fifth, with violent assaults on prison guards more than doubling. The number of elderly people receiving government-furnished care that enables them to remain in their homes has fallen by roughly a quarter.

      In an alternate reality, this nasty stretch of history might now be ending. Austerity measures were imposed in the name of eliminating budget deficits, and last year Britain finally produced a modest budget surplus.

      But the reality at hand is dominated by worries that Britain’s pending departure from the European Union — Brexit, as it is known — will depress growth for years to come. Though every major economy on earth has been expanding lately, Britain’s barely grew during the first three months of 2018. The unemployment rate sits just above 4 percent — its lowest level since 1975 — yet most wages remain lower than a decade ago, after accounting for rising prices.

      In the blue-collar reaches of northern England, in places like Liverpool, modern history tends to be told in the cadence of lamentation, as the story of one indignity after another. In these communities, Mrs. Thatcher’s name is an epithet, and austerity is the latest villain: London bankers concocted a financial crisis, multiplying their wealth through reckless gambling; then London politicians used budget deficits as an excuse to cut spending on the poor while handing tax cuts to corporations. Robin Hood, reversed.

      “It’s clearly an attack on our class,” says Dave Kelly, a retired bricklayer in the town of Kirkby, on the outskirts of Liverpool, where many factories sit empty, broken monuments to another age. “It’s an attack on who we are. The whole fabric of society is breaking down.”

      As much as any city, Liverpool has seen sweeping changes in its economic fortunes.

      In the 17th century, the city enriched itself on human misery. Local shipping companies sent vessels to West Africa, transporting slaves to the American colonies and returning bearing the fruits of bondage — cotton and tobacco, principally.

      The cotton fed the mills of Manchester nearby, yielding textiles destined for multiple continents. By the late 19th century, Liverpool’s port had become the gateway to the British Empire, its status underscored by the shipping company headquarters lining the River Mersey.

      By the next century — through the Great Depression and the German bombardment of World War II — Liverpool had descended into seemingly terminal decline. Its hard luck, blue-collar station was central to the identity of its most famous export, the Beatles, whose star power seemed enhanced by the fact such talent could emerge from such a place.

      Today, more than a quarter of Liverpool’s roughly 460,000 residents are officially poor, making austerity traumatic: Public institutions charged with aiding vulnerable people are themselves straining from cutbacks.

      Over the past eight years, the Merseyside Fire and Rescue Service, which serves greater Liverpool, has closed five fire stations while cutting the force to 620 firefighters from about 1,000.

      “I’ve had to preside over the systematic dismantling of the system,” says the fire chief, Dan Stephens.

      His department recently analyzed the 83 deaths that occurred in accidental house fires from 2007 to 2017. The majority of the victims — 51 people — lived alone and were alone at the time of the deadly fire. Nineteen of those 51 were in need of some form of home care.

      The loss of home care — a casualty of austerity — has meant that more older people are being left alone unattended.

      Virtually every public agency now struggles to do more with less while attending to additional problems once handled by some other outfit whose budget is also in tatters.

      Chief Stephens said people losing cash benefits are falling behind on their electric bills and losing service, resorting to candles for light — a major fire risk.

      The city has cut mental health services, so fewer staff members are visiting people prone to hoarding newspapers, for instance, leaving veritable bonfires piling up behind doors, unseen.

      “There are knock-on effects all the way through the system,” says Chief Stephens, who recently announced plans to resign and move to Australia.

      The National Health Service has supposedly been spared from budget cuts. But spending has been frozen in many areas, resulting in cuts per patient. At public hospitals, people have grown resigned to waiting for hours for emergency care, and weeks for referrals to specialists.

      “I think the government wants to run it down so the whole thing crumbles and they don’t have to worry about it anymore,” says Kenneth Buckle, a retired postal worker who has been waiting three months for a referral for a double knee replacement. “Everything takes forever now.”

      At Fulwood Green Medical Center in Liverpool, Dr. Simon Bowers, a general practitioner, points to austerity as an aggravating factor in the flow of stress-related maladies he encounters — high blood pressure, heart problems, sleeplessness, anxiety.

      He argues that the cuts, and the deterioration of the National Health Service, represent a renouncement of Britain’s historical debts. He rattles off the lowlights — the slave trave, colonial barbarity.

      “We as a country said, ‘We have been cruel. Let’s be nice now and look after everyone,’” Dr. Bowers says. “The N.H.S. has everyone’s back. It doesn’t matter how rich or poor you are. It’s written into the psyche of this country.”

      “Austerity isn’t a necessity,” he continued. “It’s a political choice, to move Britain in a different way. I can’t see a rationale beyond further enriching the rich while making the lives of the poor more miserable.”

      Wealthy Britons remain among the world’s most comfortable people, enjoying lavish homes, private medical care, top-notch schools and restaurants run by chefs from Paris and Tokyo. The poor, the elderly, the disabled and the jobless are increasingly prone to Kafka-esque tangles with the bureaucracy to keep public support.

      For Emma Wilde, a 31-year-old single mother, the misadventure began with an inscrutable piece of correspondence.

      Raised in the Liverpool neighborhood of Croxteth, Ms. Wilde has depended on welfare benefits to support herself and her two children. Her father, a retired window washer, is disabled. She has been taking care of him full time, relying on a so-called caregiver’s allowance, which amounts to about $85 a week, and income support reaching about $145 a month.

      The letter put this money in jeopardy.

      Sent by a private firm contracted to manage part of the government’s welfare programs, it informed Ms. Wilde that she was being investigated for fraud, accused of living with a partner — a development she is obliged to have reported.

      Ms. Wilde lives only with her children, she insists. But while the investigation proceeds, her benefits are suspended.

      Eight weeks after the money ceased, Ms. Wilde’s electricity was shut off for nonpayment. During the late winter, she and her children went to bed before 7 p.m. to save on heat. She has swallowed her pride and visited a food bank at a local church, bringing home bread and hamburger patties.

      “I felt a bit ashamed, like I had done something wrong, ” Ms. Wilde says. “But then you’ve got to feed the kids.”

      She has been corresponding with the Department for Work and Pensions, mailing bank statements to try to prove her limited income and to restore her funds.

      The experience has given her a perverse sense of community. At the local center where she brings her children for free meals, she has met people who lost their unemployment benefits after their bus was late and they missed an appointment with a caseworker. She and her friends exchange tips on where to secure hand-me-down clothes.

      “Everyone is in the same situation now,” Ms. Wilde says. “You just don’t have enough to live on.”

      From its inception, austerity carried a whiff of moral righteousness, as if those who delivered it were sober-minded grown-ups. Belt tightening was sold as a shared undertaking, an unpleasant yet unavoidable reckoning with dangerous budget deficits.

      “The truth is that the country was living beyond its means,” the then-chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne, declared in outlining his budget to Parliament in 2010. “Today, we have paid the debts of a failed past, and laid the foundations for a more prosperous future.”

      “Prosperity for all,” he added.

      Eight years later, housing subsidies have been restricted, along with tax credits for poor families. The government has frozen unemployment and disability benefits even as costs of food and other necessities have climbed. Over the last five years, the government has begun transitioning to so-called Universal Credit, giving those who receive benefits lump sum payments in place of funds from individual programs. Many have lost support for weeks or months while their cases have shifted to the new system.

      All of which is unfortunate yet inescapable, assert Conservative lawmakers. The government was borrowing roughly one-fourth of what it was spending. To put off cuts was to risk turning Britain into the next Greece.

      “The hard left has never been very clear about what their alternative to the program was,” says Neil O’Brien, a Conservative lawmaker who was previously a Treasury adviser to Mr. Osborne. “Presumably, it would be some enormous increase in taxation, but they are a bit shy about what that would mean.”

      He rejects the notion that austerity is a means of class warfare, noting that wealthy people have been hit with higher taxes on investment and expanded fees when buying luxury properties.

      Britain spends roughly the same portion of its national income on public spending today as it did a decade ago, said Paul Johnson, director of the Institute for Fiscal Studies.

      But those dependent on state support express a sense that the system has been rigged to discard them.

      Glendys Perry, 61, was born with cerebral palsy, making it difficult for her to walk. For three decades, she answered the phones at an auto parts company. After she lost that job in 2010, she lived on a disability check.

      Last summer, a letter came, summoning her to “an assessment.” The first question dispatched any notion that this was a sincere exploration.

      “How long have you had cerebral palsy?” (From birth.) “Will it get better?” (No.)

      In fact, her bones were weakening, and she fell often. Her hands were not quick enough to catch her body, resulting in bruises to her face.

      The man handling the assessment seemed uninterested.

      “Can you walk from here to there?” he asked her.

      He dropped a pen on the floor and commanded her to pick it up — a test of her dexterity.

      “How did you come here?” he asked her.

      “By bus,” she replied.

      Can you make a cup of tea? Can you get dressed?

      “I thought, ‘I’m physically disabled,’” she says. “‘Not mentally.’”

      When the letter came informing her that she was no longer entitled to her disability payment — that she had been deemed fit for work — she was not surprised.

      “They want you to be off of benefits,” she says. “I think they were just ticking boxes.”

      The political architecture of Britain insulates those imposing austerity from the wrath of those on the receiving end. London makes the aggregate cuts, while leaving to local politicians the messy work of allocating the pain.

      Spend a morning with the aggrieved residents of Prescot and one hears scant mention of London, or even austerity. People train their fury on the Knowsley Council, and especially on the man who was until recently its leader, Andy Moorhead. They accuse him of hastily concocting plans to sell Browns Field without community consultation.

      Mr. Moorhead, 62, seems an unlikely figure for the role of austerity villain. A career member of the Labour Party, he has the everyday bearing of a genial denizen of the corner pub.

      “I didn’t become a politician to take things off of people,” he says. “But you’ve got the reality to deal with.”

      The reality is that London is phasing out grants to local governments, forcing councils to live on housing and business taxes.

      “Austerity is here to stay,” says Jonathan Davies, director of the Center for Urban Research on Austerity at De Montfort University in Leicester, England. “What we might now see over the next two years is a wave of bankruptcies, like Detroit.”

      Indeed, the council of Northamptonshire, in the center of England, recently became the first local government in nearly two decades to meet that fate.

      Knowsley expects to spend $192 million in the next budget year, Mr. Moorhead says, with 60 percent of that absorbed by care for the elderly and services for children with health and developmental needs. An additional 18 percent will be spent on services the council must provide by law, such as garbage collection and highway maintenance.

      To Mr. Moorhead, the equation ends with the imperative to sell valuable land, yielding an endowment to protect remaining parks and services.

      “We’ve got to pursue development,” Mr. Moorhead says. “Locally, I’m the bad guy.”

      The real malefactors are the same as ever, he says.

      He points at a picture of Mrs. Thatcher on the wall behind him. He vents about London bankers, who left his people to clean up their mess.

      “No one should be doing this,” he says. “Not in the fifth-wealthiest country in the whole world. Sacking people, making people redundant, reducing our services for the vulnerable in our society. It’s the worst job in the world.”

      Now, it is someone else’s job. In early May, the local Labour Party ousted Mr. Moorhead as council leader amid mounting anger over the planned sale of parks.

      https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/28/world/europe/uk-austerity-poverty.html

      Sadly it's not just the last 8 years, lots of areas have had no money put into them for years and years, the country looks a mess in a lot of towns, take a look at most high streets they all look the same, run down and nothing but cash cheque shops, pound shops, charity shops and bookies it's a f*cking disgrace and all governments are responsible but have to agree the Tories are obviously the biggest culprits. Sad.
      stuey
      • LFC Reds Subscriber
      • ******
      • 33,752 posts | 3303 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #88: Jun 03, 2018 01:14:41 pm
      You just have to love the cheek of any preacher that could blag enough people to fund and pay for a private jet for him!!

      US preacher asks followers to help buy fourth private jet

      A US televangelist has asked his followers to help fund his fourth private jet - because Jesus "wouldn't be riding a donkey".

      Jesse Duplantis said God had told him to buy a Falcoln 7X for $54m (£41m).

      He added he was hesitant about the purchase at first, but said God had told him: "I didn't ask you to pay for it. I asked you to believe for it."

      Although preachers owning private jets is not unusual, this particular appeal has caused controversy.

      Twitter users responded to the request with disbelief, with many quoting Bible verses warning against greed and "false prophets", or suggesting that the money could be better used to help the poor.

      In a video address posted on his website, 68-year-old Mr Duplantis explained: "You know, I've owned three different jets in my life, and I've used them and just burning them up for the Lord Jesus Christ.

      "Now, some people believe that preachers shouldn't have jets. I really believe that preachers ought to go on every available voice, every available outlet, to get this Gospel preached to the world."

      Standing beside framed pictures of his current fleet, he said that the jet he bought 12 years ago was no longer sufficient for his ministry because he could not fly non-stop, meaning he had to pay "exorbitant" refuelling costs.

      Another picture which appeared in the video showed the preacher standing with the three aircraft, above the caption: "It's not about possessions, it's about priorities."

      Mr Duplantis justified the request by saying that Jesus had told people to "go into the world and preach the Gospel to every creature, now how we gonna do that? I can't live long enough to travel by car or by ship or by train, but I can do it by an aeroplane".

      In 2015, Mr Duplantis appeared in a video with another preacher, Kenneth Copeland, in which Mr Copeland described travelling on commercial airlines as being "in a long tube with a bunch of demons".

      https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/amp/world-us-canada-44305873


      As ever religion is a nice little earner if a good number of the populace are stupid enough to part with money and give it to frauds claiming to be " messengers of God".

      Not as bad as decapitating people, mass genocide and murdering children granted but the way religion has been grotesquely adapted to suit hideous agendas by the "messengers of God" since time immemorial is nothing short of shocking.

      heimdall
      • LFC Reds Subscriber
      • ******
      • 10,859 posts | 2284 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #89: Jun 03, 2018 03:58:36 pm
      As ever religion is a nice little earner if a good number of the populace are stupid enough to part with money and give it to frauds claiming to be " messengers of God".

      Not as bad as decapitating people, mass genocide and murdering children granted but the way religion has been grotesquely adapted to suit hideous agendas by the "messengers of God" since time immemorial is nothing short of shocking.



      Please explain how the main stream of modern religions are bad. The fringes are of course nasty but I'm referring to the type of religion 99.9% of religious people practice in their churches.
      waltonl4
      • LFC Reds Subscriber
      • ******
      • 28,389 posts | 4326 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #90: Jun 04, 2018 09:22:58 am
      Excellent piece from the NY Times regarding austerity in Britain, a lot of it centred around Liverpool & Merseyside.

      In Britain, Austerity Is Changing Everything

      After eight years of budget cutting, Britain is looking less like the rest of Europe and more like the United States, with a shrinking welfare state and spreading poverty.

      PRESCOT, England — A walk through this modest town in the northwest of England amounts to a tour of the casualties of Britain’s age of austerity.

      The old library building has been sold and refashioned into a glass-fronted luxury home. The leisure center has been razed, eliminating the public swimming pool. The local museum has receded into town history. The police station has been shuttered.

      Now, as the local government desperately seeks to turn assets into cash, Browns Field, a lush park in the center of town, may be doomed, too. At a meeting in November, the council included it on a list of 17 parks to sell to developers.

      “Everybody uses this park,” says Jackie Lewis, who raised two children in a red brick house a block away. “This is probably our last piece of community space. It’s been one after the other. You just end up despondent.”

      In the eight years since London began sharply curtailing support for local governments, the borough of Knowsley, a bedroom community of Liverpool, has seen its budget cut roughly in half. Liverpool itself has suffered a nearly two-thirds cut in funding from the national government — its largest source of discretionary revenue. Communities in much of Britain have seen similar losses.

      For a nation with a storied history of public largess, the protracted campaign of budget cutting, started in 2010 by a government led by the Conservative Party, has delivered a monumental shift in British life. A wave of austerity has yielded a country that has grown accustomed to living with less, even as many measures of social well-being — crime rates, opioid addiction, infant mortality, childhood poverty and homelessness — point to a deteriorating quality of life.

      When Ms. Lewis and her husband bought their home a quarter-century ago, Prescot had a comforting village feel. Now, core government relief programs are being cut and public facilities eliminated, adding pressure to public services like police and fire departments, just as they, too, grapple with diminished funding.

      By 2020, reductions already set in motion will produce cuts to British social welfare programs exceeding $36 billion a year compared with a decade earlier, or more than $900 annually for every working-age person in the country, according to a report from the Center for Regional Economic and Social Research at Sheffield Hallam University. In Liverpool, the losses will reach $1,200 a year per working-age person, the study says.

      “The government has created destitution,” says Barry Kushner, a Labour Party councilman in Liverpool and the cabinet member for children’s services. “Austerity has had nothing to do with economics. It was about getting out from under welfare. It’s about politics abandoning vulnerable people.”

      Conservative Party leaders say that austerity has been driven by nothing more grandiose than arithmetic.

      “It’s the ideology of two plus two equals four,” says Daniel Finkelstein, a Conservative member of the upper chamber of Parliament, the House of Lords, and a columnist for The Times of London. “It wasn’t driven by a desire to reduce spending on public services. It was driven by the fact that we had a vast deficit problem, and the debt was going to keep growing.”

      Whatever the operative thinking, austerity’s manifestations are palpable and omnipresent. It has refashioned British society, making it less like the rest of Western Europe, with its generous social safety nets and egalitarian ethos, and more like the United States, where millions lack health care and job loss can set off a precipitous plunge in fortunes.

      Much as the United States took the Great Depression of the 1930s as impetus to construct a national pension system while eventually delivering health care for the elderly and the poor, Britain reacted to the trauma of World War II by forging its own welfare state. The United States has steadily reduced benefits since the Reagan Revolution of the 1980s. Britain rolled back its programs in the same era, under the leadership of Margaret Thatcher. Still, its safety net remained robust by world standards.

      Then came the global financial panic of 2008 — the most crippling economic downturn since the Great Depression. Britain’s turn from its welfare state in the face of yawning budget deficits is a conspicuous indicator that the world has been refashioned by the crisis.

      As the global economy now negotiates a wrenching transition — with itinerant jobs replacing full-time positions and robots substituting for human labor — Britain’s experience provokes doubts about the durability of the traditional welfare model. As Western-style capitalism confronts profound questions about economic justice, vulnerable people appear to be growing more so.

      Conservative Party leaders initially sold budget cuts as a virtue, ushering in what they called the Big Society. Diminish the role of a bloated government bureaucracy, they contended, and grass-roots organizations, charities and private companies would step to the fore, reviving communities and delivering public services more efficiently.

      To a degree, a spirit of voluntarism materialized. At public libraries, volunteers now outnumber paid staff. In struggling communities, residents have formed food banks while distributing hand-me-down school uniforms. But to many in Britain, this is akin to setting your house on fire and then reveling in the community spirit as neighbors come running to help extinguish the blaze.

      Most view the Big Society as another piece of political sloganeering — long since ditched by the Conservatives — that served as justification for an austerity program that has advanced the refashioning unleashed in the 1980s by Mrs. Thatcher.

      “We are making cuts that I think Margaret Thatcher, back in the 1980s, could only have dreamt of,” Greg Barker said in a speech in 2011, when he was a Conservative member of Parliament.

      A backlash ensued, with public recognition that budget cuts came with tax relief for corporations, and that the extensive ranks of the wealthy were little disturbed.

      Britain hasn’t endured austerity to the same degree as Greece, where cutbacks were swift and draconian. Instead, British austerity has been a slow bleed, though the cumulative toll has been substantial.

      Local governments have suffered a roughly one-fifth plunge in revenue since 2010, after adding taxes they collect, according to the Institute for Fiscal Studies in London.

      Nationally, spending on police forces has dropped 17 percent since 2010, while the number of police officers has dropped 14 percent, according to an analysis by the Institute for Government. Spending on road maintenance has shrunk more than one-fourth, while support for libraries has fallen nearly a third.

      The national court system has eliminated nearly a third of its staff. Spending on prisons has plunged more than a fifth, with violent assaults on prison guards more than doubling. The number of elderly people receiving government-furnished care that enables them to remain in their homes has fallen by roughly a quarter.

      In an alternate reality, this nasty stretch of history might now be ending. Austerity measures were imposed in the name of eliminating budget deficits, and last year Britain finally produced a modest budget surplus.

      But the reality at hand is dominated by worries that Britain’s pending departure from the European Union — Brexit, as it is known — will depress growth for years to come. Though every major economy on earth has been expanding lately, Britain’s barely grew during the first three months of 2018. The unemployment rate sits just above 4 percent — its lowest level since 1975 — yet most wages remain lower than a decade ago, after accounting for rising prices.

      In the blue-collar reaches of northern England, in places like Liverpool, modern history tends to be told in the cadence of lamentation, as the story of one indignity after another. In these communities, Mrs. Thatcher’s name is an epithet, and austerity is the latest villain: London bankers concocted a financial crisis, multiplying their wealth through reckless gambling; then London politicians used budget deficits as an excuse to cut spending on the poor while handing tax cuts to corporations. Robin Hood, reversed.

      “It’s clearly an attack on our class,” says Dave Kelly, a retired bricklayer in the town of Kirkby, on the outskirts of Liverpool, where many factories sit empty, broken monuments to another age. “It’s an attack on who we are. The whole fabric of society is breaking down.”

      As much as any city, Liverpool has seen sweeping changes in its economic fortunes.

      In the 17th century, the city enriched itself on human misery. Local shipping companies sent vessels to West Africa, transporting slaves to the American colonies and returning bearing the fruits of bondage — cotton and tobacco, principally.

      The cotton fed the mills of Manchester nearby, yielding textiles destined for multiple continents. By the late 19th century, Liverpool’s port had become the gateway to the British Empire, its status underscored by the shipping company headquarters lining the River Mersey.

      By the next century — through the Great Depression and the German bombardment of World War II — Liverpool had descended into seemingly terminal decline. Its hard luck, blue-collar station was central to the identity of its most famous export, the Beatles, whose star power seemed enhanced by the fact such talent could emerge from such a place.

      Today, more than a quarter of Liverpool’s roughly 460,000 residents are officially poor, making austerity traumatic: Public institutions charged with aiding vulnerable people are themselves straining from cutbacks.

      Over the past eight years, the Merseyside Fire and Rescue Service, which serves greater Liverpool, has closed five fire stations while cutting the force to 620 firefighters from about 1,000.

      “I’ve had to preside over the systematic dismantling of the system,” says the fire chief, Dan Stephens.

      His department recently analyzed the 83 deaths that occurred in accidental house fires from 2007 to 2017. The majority of the victims — 51 people — lived alone and were alone at the time of the deadly fire. Nineteen of those 51 were in need of some form of home care.

      The loss of home care — a casualty of austerity — has meant that more older people are being left alone unattended.

      Virtually every public agency now struggles to do more with less while attending to additional problems once handled by some other outfit whose budget is also in tatters.

      Chief Stephens said people losing cash benefits are falling behind on their electric bills and losing service, resorting to candles for light — a major fire risk.

      The city has cut mental health services, so fewer staff members are visiting people prone to hoarding newspapers, for instance, leaving veritable bonfires piling up behind doors, unseen.

      “There are knock-on effects all the way through the system,” says Chief Stephens, who recently announced plans to resign and move to Australia.

      The National Health Service has supposedly been spared from budget cuts. But spending has been frozen in many areas, resulting in cuts per patient. At public hospitals, people have grown resigned to waiting for hours for emergency care, and weeks for referrals to specialists.

      “I think the government wants to run it down so the whole thing crumbles and they don’t have to worry about it anymore,” says Kenneth Buckle, a retired postal worker who has been waiting three months for a referral for a double knee replacement. “Everything takes forever now.”

      At Fulwood Green Medical Center in Liverpool, Dr. Simon Bowers, a general practitioner, points to austerity as an aggravating factor in the flow of stress-related maladies he encounters — high blood pressure, heart problems, sleeplessness, anxiety.

      He argues that the cuts, and the deterioration of the National Health Service, represent a renouncement of Britain’s historical debts. He rattles off the lowlights — the slave trave, colonial barbarity.

      “We as a country said, ‘We have been cruel. Let’s be nice now and look after everyone,’” Dr. Bowers says. “The N.H.S. has everyone’s back. It doesn’t matter how rich or poor you are. It’s written into the psyche of this country.”

      “Austerity isn’t a necessity,” he continued. “It’s a political choice, to move Britain in a different way. I can’t see a rationale beyond further enriching the rich while making the lives of the poor more miserable.”

      Wealthy Britons remain among the world’s most comfortable people, enjoying lavish homes, private medical care, top-notch schools and restaurants run by chefs from Paris and Tokyo. The poor, the elderly, the disabled and the jobless are increasingly prone to Kafka-esque tangles with the bureaucracy to keep public support.

      For Emma Wilde, a 31-year-old single mother, the misadventure began with an inscrutable piece of correspondence.

      Raised in the Liverpool neighborhood of Croxteth, Ms. Wilde has depended on welfare benefits to support herself and her two children. Her father, a retired window washer, is disabled. She has been taking care of him full time, relying on a so-called caregiver’s allowance, which amounts to about $85 a week, and income support reaching about $145 a month.

      The letter put this money in jeopardy.

      Sent by a private firm contracted to manage part of the government’s welfare programs, it informed Ms. Wilde that she was being investigated for fraud, accused of living with a partner — a development she is obliged to have reported.

      Ms. Wilde lives only with her children, she insists. But while the investigation proceeds, her benefits are suspended.

      Eight weeks after the money ceased, Ms. Wilde’s electricity was shut off for nonpayment. During the late winter, she and her children went to bed before 7 p.m. to save on heat. She has swallowed her pride and visited a food bank at a local church, bringing home bread and hamburger patties.

      “I felt a bit ashamed, like I had done something wrong, ” Ms. Wilde says. “But then you’ve got to feed the kids.”

      She has been corresponding with the Department for Work and Pensions, mailing bank statements to try to prove her limited income and to restore her funds.

      The experience has given her a perverse sense of community. At the local center where she brings her children for free meals, she has met people who lost their unemployment benefits after their bus was late and they missed an appointment with a caseworker. She and her friends exchange tips on where to secure hand-me-down clothes.

      “Everyone is in the same situation now,” Ms. Wilde says. “You just don’t have enough to live on.”

      From its inception, austerity carried a whiff of moral righteousness, as if those who delivered it were sober-minded grown-ups. Belt tightening was sold as a shared undertaking, an unpleasant yet unavoidable reckoning with dangerous budget deficits.

      “The truth is that the country was living beyond its means,” the then-chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne, declared in outlining his budget to Parliament in 2010. “Today, we have paid the debts of a failed past, and laid the foundations for a more prosperous future.”

      “Prosperity for all,” he added.

      Eight years later, housing subsidies have been restricted, along with tax credits for poor families. The government has frozen unemployment and disability benefits even as costs of food and other necessities have climbed. Over the last five years, the government has begun transitioning to so-called Universal Credit, giving those who receive benefits lump sum payments in place of funds from individual programs. Many have lost support for weeks or months while their cases have shifted to the new system.

      All of which is unfortunate yet inescapable, assert Conservative lawmakers. The government was borrowing roughly one-fourth of what it was spending. To put off cuts was to risk turning Britain into the next Greece.

      “The hard left has never been very clear about what their alternative to the program was,” says Neil O’Brien, a Conservative lawmaker who was previously a Treasury adviser to Mr. Osborne. “Presumably, it would be some enormous increase in taxation, but they are a bit shy about what that would mean.”

      He rejects the notion that austerity is a means of class warfare, noting that wealthy people have been hit with higher taxes on investment and expanded fees when buying luxury properties.

      Britain spends roughly the same portion of its national income on public spending today as it did a decade ago, said Paul Johnson, director of the Institute for Fiscal Studies.

      But those dependent on state support express a sense that the system has been rigged to discard them.

      Glendys Perry, 61, was born with cerebral palsy, making it difficult for her to walk. For three decades, she answered the phones at an auto parts company. After she lost that job in 2010, she lived on a disability check.

      Last summer, a letter came, summoning her to “an assessment.” The first question dispatched any notion that this was a sincere exploration.

      “How long have you had cerebral palsy?” (From birth.) “Will it get better?” (No.)

      In fact, her bones were weakening, and she fell often. Her hands were not quick enough to catch her body, resulting in bruises to her face.

      The man handling the assessment seemed uninterested.

      “Can you walk from here to there?” he asked her.

      He dropped a pen on the floor and commanded her to pick it up — a test of her dexterity.

      “How did you come here?” he asked her.

      “By bus,” she replied.

      Can you make a cup of tea? Can you get dressed?

      “I thought, ‘I’m physically disabled,’” she says. “‘Not mentally.’”

      When the letter came informing her that she was no longer entitled to her disability payment — that she had been deemed fit for work — she was not surprised.

      “They want you to be off of benefits,” she says. “I think they were just ticking boxes.”

      The political architecture of Britain insulates those imposing austerity from the wrath of those on the receiving end. London makes the aggregate cuts, while leaving to local politicians the messy work of allocating the pain.

      Spend a morning with the aggrieved residents of Prescot and one hears scant mention of London, or even austerity. People train their fury on the Knowsley Council, and especially on the man who was until recently its leader, Andy Moorhead. They accuse him of hastily concocting plans to sell Browns Field without community consultation.

      Mr. Moorhead, 62, seems an unlikely figure for the role of austerity villain. A career member of the Labour Party, he has the everyday bearing of a genial denizen of the corner pub.

      “I didn’t become a politician to take things off of people,” he says. “But you’ve got the reality to deal with.”

      The reality is that London is phasing out grants to local governments, forcing councils to live on housing and business taxes.

      “Austerity is here to stay,” says Jonathan Davies, director of the Center for Urban Research on Austerity at De Montfort University in Leicester, England. “What we might now see over the next two years is a wave of bankruptcies, like Detroit.”

      Indeed, the council of Northamptonshire, in the center of England, recently became the first local government in nearly two decades to meet that fate.

      Knowsley expects to spend $192 million in the next budget year, Mr. Moorhead says, with 60 percent of that absorbed by care for the elderly and services for children with health and developmental needs. An additional 18 percent will be spent on services the council must provide by law, such as garbage collection and highway maintenance.

      To Mr. Moorhead, the equation ends with the imperative to sell valuable land, yielding an endowment to protect remaining parks and services.

      “We’ve got to pursue development,” Mr. Moorhead says. “Locally, I’m the bad guy.”

      The real malefactors are the same as ever, he says.

      He points at a picture of Mrs. Thatcher on the wall behind him. He vents about London bankers, who left his people to clean up their mess.

      “No one should be doing this,” he says. “Not in the fifth-wealthiest country in the whole world. Sacking people, making people redundant, reducing our services for the vulnerable in our society. It’s the worst job in the world.”

      Now, it is someone else’s job. In early May, the local Labour Party ousted Mr. Moorhead as council leader amid mounting anger over the planned sale of parks.

      https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/28/world/europe/uk-austerity-poverty.html

      I saw a report that most of the stuff about Prescot was bollox . They showed building that had been closed due to cuts when in fact they had moved into New buildings.
      Selling public spaces however is totally unforgiveable .
      Arab Scouse
      • Forum Legend - Fagan
      • *****

      • 3,501 posts | 611 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #91: Jun 08, 2018 02:02:24 pm
      Anthony Bourdain found dead, apparent suicide

      One of my favorite celebrity chefs.

      Rest in peace.. I'm absolutely shocked :(
      YANK_LFC_FAN
      • LFC Reds Subscriber
      • ******
      • 3,202 posts | 330 
      • Timid men prefer the calm of despotism!
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #92: Jun 08, 2018 03:58:00 pm
      Anthony Bourdain found dead, apparent suicide

      One of my favorite celebrity chefs.

      Rest in peace.. I'm absolutely shocked :(

      I am actually upset about this. I loved his shows. He was a Rockstar to me. He actually made you want to travel. He was very political but not controversial. He would go to Israel and and eat dinner with an Israeli family and you would learn the things that the news doesnt report. Then he would go and eat with a family in Gaza and show how similar it is. He was an amazing reporter and travel writer. He was a purple belt in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. He would go and drink with locals and then just hang out with them. He also had his demons and I think thats maybe what happened. R.I.P Anthony.
      « Last Edit: Jun 08, 2018 10:07:01 pm by YANK_LFC_FAN »
      Frankly, Mr Shankly
      • Guest
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #93: Jun 09, 2018 12:15:52 am
      I am actually upset about this. I loved his shows. He was a Rockstar to me. He actually made you want to travel. He was very political but not controversial. He would go to Israel and and eat dinner with an Israeli family and you would learn the things that the news doesnt report. Then he would go and eat with a family in Gaza and show how similar it is. He was an amazing reporter and travel writer. He was a purple belt in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. He would go and drink with locals and then just hang out with them. He also had his demons and I think thats maybe what happened. R.I.P Anthony.

      Heard of the guy but never seen him in action on tv. In the UK there's far too much home cooking sh*te shows but the cookery shows I do love are the ones where they travel abroad and really get behind the culture of the food.

      Call me a Hairy Bikers fan...dude!
      Arab Scouse
      • Forum Legend - Fagan
      • *****

      • 3,501 posts | 611 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #94: Jun 09, 2018 11:06:24 pm
      I am actually upset about this. I loved his shows. He was a Rockstar to me. He actually made you want to travel. He was very political but not controversial. He would go to Israel and and eat dinner with an Israeli family and you would learn the things that the news doesnt report. Then he would go and eat with a family in Gaza and show how similar it is. He was an amazing reporter and travel writer. He was a purple belt in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. He would go and drink with locals and then just hang out with them. He also had his demons and I think thats maybe what happened. R.I.P Anthony.

      He actually made me enjoy food and enjoy cooking too (I'm an avid cook) and I own one of his cook books. His story telling is amazing and the way he talks to locals and embraces different opinions and cultures is great. He did a show in Beirut 3 times, one in 2006 when the war with Israel happened then back in 2010 and 2015. Sat with a family in one of the poorest neighborhoods in Beirut and had lunch, talked politics and listened to their stories. It just tells you how amazing he was. not to mention the fact that he stood by his gf after the Weinstein debacle.


       I'm really gutted, really.
      Arab Scouse
      • Forum Legend - Fagan
      • *****

      • 3,501 posts | 611 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #95: Jun 09, 2018 11:07:19 pm
      Heard of the guy but never seen him in action on tv. In the UK there's far too much home cooking sh*te shows but the cookery shows I do love are the ones where they travel abroad and really get behind the culture of the food.

      Call me a Hairy Bikers fan...dude!

      Mate, you got the best cook in town, Gordon Ramsay.

      I f*cking love him to bits  :D
      FATKOPITE10
      • LFC Reds Subscriber
      • ******
      • 11,379 posts | 2163 
      • Liverpool fc give me tourettes
      HUYTON RED
      • Forum Legend - Shankly
      • ******

      • 30,516 posts | 4346 
      Re: News Stories May 2018
      Reply #97: Jun 10, 2018 12:43:59 am
      I am actually upset about this. I loved his shows. He was a Rockstar to me. He actually made you want to travel. He was very political but not controversial. He would go to Israel and and eat dinner with an Israeli family and you would learn the things that the news doesnt report. Then he would go and eat with a family in Gaza and show how similar it is. He was an amazing reporter and travel writer. He was a purple belt in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. He would go and drink with locals and then just hang out with them. He also had his demons and I think thats maybe what happened. R.I.P Anthony.

      Saw a few of the Parts Unknown series, was very impressed with the programme, also watched the CNN hour long tribute programme they put together last night, you could tell a few of the CNN's broadcasters were genuinely shocked at Anthony's death.

      RIP

      Quick Reply